When taking notes about these significant terms it may be helpful to make sure you are writing down information that answers the following questions:

  1. Who?
  2. What?
  3. When?
  4. Where?
  5. Historical Significance (aka. So what? Why is this important?)

DISCLAIMER: THE INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE IS A COMPILATION OF CLASS ACTIVITIES THAT HAVE BEEN COMPLETED TO ASSIST YOU WITH PREPARING FOR THE EXAM. IN NO WAY IS THIS MEANT TO BE YOUR ONLY MEANS OF STUDY NOR HAS THIS INFORMATION BEEN CHECKED FOR ACCURACY. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO BE IN CLASS, STUDY, AND READ IN ORDER TO OBTAIN ALL THE KNOWLEDGE NEEDED TO BE SUCCESSFUL ON YOUR EXAMINATION.


Exam 1 Study Guide

Exam 1 Pyramid Review Game

Professor Cofer's Classes' Terms 1

Professor Cofer's Classes' Terms 2

Manhattan Project

The Manhattan Project was a secret project to create nuclear weapons that began in 1939 under FDR. The lead scientist was Robert Oppenheimer. This project was completed in a number of facilities across the United States such as Oak Ridge, TN. When FDR died, the project was revealed to President Truman. Although Germany had already surrendered, World War II was not over. The first successful test run of an atomic bomb took place July 16, 1945, in New Mexico, even though there was a small possibility that the bomb could destroy the world. Although Japan was threatened with the dropping of an atomic weapon, they would not surrender. On August 6, 1945, the first atomic bomb was dropped in Hiroshima, killing thousands of people instantly. The Japanese still refused to surrender. On August 9, 1945, a second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki with the same level of devastation. Japan surrendered on August 14, 1945, ending WWII. This is significant because many American lives were spared when the war ended. This also sent a message to the USSR, who was refusing to give up control in Eastern Europe, specifically of Poland. Additionally, the Cold War and arms race began after WWII ended because of the bombs dropped on Japan.

Radical Reconstruction

14th Amendment

Freedmen's Bureau

Sharecroppers

Election of 1876

Chinese Exclusion Act

Homesteaders

Dawes Act

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Ghost Dance

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Vertical and Horizontal Integration

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Pullman Strike

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Jacob Riis

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Spanish-American War

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Philippines War

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1. The Civil War had resolved the nation’s greatest racial question, that of slavery. However, Americans in the second half of the 19th century continued to deal with the questions about the role of race and the relationships between different races and ethnic groups in American society. We discussed issues of race and ethnicity after the war in the South, in Northern cities, in the West, on the Great Plains, and in the wider world. In which of these areas do you think American ideas about race had the most effect upon the development of the nation? In your answer, be sure to discuss in detail the history of race relations in at least three of the regions listed above.

Essay 1 Outline

2. Between the end of the Civil War and the end of the 19th century, Americans completed the conquest of their portion of North America and then ventured out into the wider world to take colonial possessions. We’ve discussed racial, economic, and political reasons for this expansionist policy. What do you think is the most important factor driving Americans to expand? In your answer, be sure to explain how all three of these factors influenced the nation.

Essay 2 Outline