When taking notes about these significant terms it may be helpful to make sure you are writing down information that answers the following questions:

  1. Who?
  2. What?
  3. When?
  4. Where?
  5. Why?
  6. How?
  7. Historical Significance (aka. So what? Why is this important?)

DISCLAIMER: THE INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE IS A COMPILATION OF CLASS ACTIVITIES THAT HAVE BEEN COMPLETED TO ASSIST YOU WITH PREPARING FOR THE EXAM. IN NO WAY IS THIS MEANT TO BE YOUR ONLY MEANS OF STUDY NOR HAS THIS INFORMATION BEEN CHECKED FOR ACCURACY. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO BE IN CLASS, STUDY, AND READ IN ORDER TO OBTAIN ALL THE KNOWLEDGE NEEDED TO BE SUCCESSFUL ON YOUR EXAMINATION. Attach:Fall2015Exam2Essay2OutlineKey.doc


Exam 2 Study Guide

The Stamp Act Riots

The Coercive Acts

The First Continental Congress

Lexington & Concord

Loyalists

Common Sense

Declaration of Independence

Saratoga

Yorktown

Treaty of Paris

Articles of Confederation

Antifederalists vs Federalists

  • Who/What:
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3/5 Compromise

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Hamilton's Economic Plan

  • Who/What: Alexander Hamilton, secretary of the treasury under the Washington administration, federalist; He proposed an economic plan based on Great Britain's. It included: national bank, power to levy and collect taxes, government will assume state debts, and encourage manufacturing. Hamilton interpreted the constitution broadly. Used the necessary and proper clause to justify the creation of a national bank. He wanted to assume debt to show that the nation could be trusted to pay off debt. He wanted this to happen so that people would come to love the government. War bonds- government paid interest to the common citizen. Speculators purchased war bonds and then resold. The Revolutionary soldiers sold their bonds because they needed money immediately rather than in the future. This bound the wealthy to the government. He wanted to encourage manufacturing so that the country could be self sufficient. With a national bank, America could control interest rates, have influence over small banks, and make larger loans because money supply is controlled. The government should be able to collect taxes so that there is a financial source for repairing roads, funding the army, and to run the infrastructure in general.
  • When: 1790
  • Historical Significance: Set up a model for modern economic principles

Jefferson's Revolution of 1800

  • Who/What: Thomas Jefferson was elected into office and started to change the way things were run in America; Empire of Liberty- decentralize the goverment; cut down on taxes but keep import taxes; Cut the military in half, and stopped progress on building a navy; he settled with a small coast guard; wanted to pay off the national debt that America; wanted to expand across the continent West and down through Mexico to South America; indepedent farmers- less class issues, all farmers should have small to medium farms; agricultural expansion West and manufacturing society on the East; give all people modest family farms so that goods could be sold to the European market
  • When: 1800
  • Historical Significance: Cut down federal debt to $40 million; doubled size of the US

Re-Export Trade

  • Who/What: Britain, France, and the US; Britain and France were at war and the US was neutral; US wanted to benefit economically from both countries; Brits controlled the seas; This meant France could not export or import sugar; Sugar was the most profitable export/import item at that time; The French decided to allow other countries carry their sugar to Europe so they could still make money; British navy began to attack American ships taking goods into France. They would confiscate the goods being carried on the ship, and force American sailors to be a part of the British navy (impressment).
  • When: early 19th century
  • Where: Caribbean, America, and Europe
  • Historical Significance: Initially American ports were able to gain wealth but it hurt the economy because it did not work; Led to Jefferson passing on embargo which ultimately was a huge fail

War of 1812

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Missouri Compromise

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Nullification Crisis

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Indian Removal

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1. In the thirteen years between the end of the Seven Years’ War and the Declaration of Independence some American colonists developed a political and economic argument in favor of independence from Great Britain. Why do you think the colonial leaders waited so long to declare independence? For full credit on the exam, be sure to describe in detail the arguments made by loyalists and patriots both for and against independence from Great Britain.

Essay 1 Outline

2. In 1776 the American colonists declared independence from Great Britain and the powerful government of the empire centered in London. Do you believe that America’s political leaders stayed true to the political goals they set out during the Revolution or that they turned away from those political goals during the six decades after the Declaration of Independence (from 1776 to 1836)? For full credit on the exam, be sure to discuss the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution; the political parties formed in this era; and the system we referred to as Jacksonian Democracy.

Essay 2 Outline