Welcome to Seminar!

  • Mindful Minute (180 - End of class)

Primary Source Analysis

  • Who is/are the author(s)? What is the author's/authors' background?
  • What is the context of this source? Historically speaking, what was happening at the time?
  • What is/are the author's thoughts regarding the subject about which they wrote?
  • What does this source tell us about the time period in which it was written?
  • What is the overall point made by this source?
  • What are some of the main quotes that point to this?

NOTE: These are not the only questions you might ask about the source. These are a guide to help you think about the source. You may have other information that you identify that helps you analyze the source.

"When in the course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth the separate & equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.
We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their creator with inherent and [certain] inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, & the pursuit of happiness: that to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed; that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, & to institute new government, laying it's foundation on such principles, & organizing it's powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety & happiness. [...]"

Excerpt of the Declaration of Independence taken from http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/disp_textbook.cfm?smtID=3&psid=2358


  • Primary Source Practice
    • Please write your names on the source!

On one sheet of paper, as a group answer (to the best of your abilities) the following questions:

  • Who is/are the author(s)? What is the author's/authors' background?
  • What is the context of this source? Historically speaking, what was happening at the time?
  • What is/are the author's thoughts regarding the subject about which they wrote?
  • What does this source tell us about the time period in which it was written?
  • What is the overall point made by this source?
  • Underline some of the main quotes that point to this on the sources you were provided.

When looking for primary sources for the historical argument paper:

  • Remember that sources may only come from the Voices of Freedom book and/or one of the three databases that Dr. Costanzo has designated.
  • There is more information in HIST BlackBoard under Historical Essay in the document entitled Finding Primary Sources for the Papers.

Monday, September 25 - We will be talking about and practicing thesis development in class. It is recommended that you have 3 to 5 potential primary sources by Monday, as we may need them on Wednesday for class.


Announcements/Reminders

Extra Credit Opportunity!

  • College 2 Career Conference: Wednesday, September 27, and Thursday, September 28
  • Pre-register here: http://career-services.tamucc.edu/c2c%20.html
  • Attend any of the sessions - be sure to sign in or check in with your ID when you get there!
  • Write a one to two paragraph synopsis of what you learned during the session. Submit this into BlackBoard in a Word or PDF document.
  • You may attend up to 2 sessions. Each session you attend is worth 25 points of extra credit.
  • Thesis and Outline due Thursday, September 28, in your HIST BlackBoard
  • Conferences for Thesis and Outline feedback will be held on Monday, October 2, Tuesday, October 3, and Wednesday, October 4. Sign-up details will be provided next week.
  • Friday, October 13 - History Exam 1 (T-minus 23 days and counting!!!)
  • Office 365 for everyone (FREE)