Main.EDLD6342CommunityLeadershipDevelopment History

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Professor: Dr. Diana K. Wenzel

Office: Faculty Center 224

Telephone: 361.825.6017

Location: CCH 262

E-mail: dwenzel@falcon.tamucc.edu
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EDLD 6342
COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
!! Heading
Changed lines 1-13 from:
TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY – CORPUS CHRISTI



!! COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
COURSE SYLLABUS – SPRING 2005
EDLD 6342



Professor:
Dr. Diana K. Wenzel Course Credit: 3 semester hours
Office: Faculty Center 224 Course Number: EDLD 6342
Telephone: 361.825.6017 Location:
CCH 262
to:

EDLD 6342
COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
!! Heading

Professor: Dr. Diana K. Wenzel
Office: Faculty Center 224

Telephone: 361
.825.6017
Location: CCH 262
Changed lines 12-218 from:
Office Hours: Tuesday 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Other times by appointment.


I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course develops collaborative leadership skills related to initiating and implementing school and community partnerships. A special focus is the enhancement of critical literacy skills – the capacity to read and interpret events within the socio
-political context of community-embedded educational leadership.

II. RATIONALE

In a global society, the complexity of issues is beyond the capacity of any one entity to address singularly. These global impacts ultimately affect children and families at the community level. Current economic and political trends dictate that citizens and service providers develop increasingly effective means of leveraging limited resources. Community
-based collaborations are proliferating. These collaborations necessitate the development of leadership skills and capacities that use new forms of power, communication, policy development, organizational infrastructure, systems thinking, economic diversity, and commitment. In order to create or meaningfully contribute to sustainable partnerships, today’s educational leader must hone new skill sets. The purpose of this course is to facilitate the types of learning experiences, within the community, that will immerse students in developing or expanding these critical collaborative leadership capacities.

III. STATE ADOPTED PROFICIENCIES (Not Applicable)

IV. ExCET STANDARDS (Not Applicable)


V. COURSE OBJECTIVES

Throughout the course, students will:

• Partner with agencies, organizations, businesses, foundations, or other institutions to address critical community issues;

• Participate in shared decision
-making processes;

• Analyze community issues from multiple perspectives;

• Integrate service learning experiences with readings on leadership, community, civic engagement, societal trends, and service;

• Develop leadership skills through the application of leadership theories in a community setting;

• Engage in civic projects focused on the resolution of community needs;

• Facilitate group processes that have the propensity to mobilize citizens toward meeting intended goals;

• Seek to generate and allocate resources as a means of meeting specified community priorities and objectives;

• Reflect critically on personal and professional development in the collaborative leadership arena.


Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to demonstrate:

• An understanding of the process through which one identifies community needs, analyzes stakeholder interests, builds alliances, and mobilizes community members to resolve issues and meet the needs of constituencies;

• Practical applications of collaborative leadership and cooperative learning models and processes (constructivist leadership);

• Service learning principles and civic engagement best practices.






VI. COURSE TOPICS

Community Capacity Building
Leadership
Social Capital
Civic Engagement
Socio
-Political Context
Social Entrepreneurism
Community Involvement in School Improvement
Grant Seeking & Funding Resources
Community Power Structures
Service Learning
Asset vs. Deficit Approaches

VII. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS AND ACTIVITIES

Seminars
Site Visits
Case Studies
Group Projects
Reflective Journaling
Portfolio Development
Cooperative Learning Teams

VIII. EVALUATION AND GRADE ASSIGNMENT

Grading Scale

A = 540
-600 points
B = 480
-539 points
C = 420
-479 points
D = 360
-419 points
F = 300
-359 points

• Late assignments will only be accepted in the case of a true emergency (with advance notification and instructor approval).

Assignment #1 (100 points)
Written literature review related to a chosen social or community issue (due 3/23/05).

Assignment #2 (150 points)
Weekly reflections (10 points per reflection).

Assignment #3 (100 points)
Grant, research, or collaboration proposal (due 4/20/05).
Assignment #4 (100 points)
Community leadership credo (due 4/27/05)

Class Attendance and Participation (150 points)
While it is understood that students have personal and professional responsibilities to fulfill during the term of this course, regular and punctual attendance is expected. Absences will result in a grade reduction of 10 points per absence. Students are expected to actively participate in class projects and discussions. There will be no make
-up assignments.

IX. COURSE SCHEDULE AND POLICIES

Week One: 1/12 Course and syllabus overview. Topic: Community

Week Two: 1/19 Topic: Civic Engagement and Social Capital

Week Three: 1/26 Topic: Service Learning

Week Four: 2/2 Topic: Community Assets

Week Five: 2/9 Topic: Social Entrepreneurism

Week Six: 2/16 Topic: Models of Collaboration

Week Seven: 2/23 Topic: Processes of Collaboration

Week Eight: 3/2 Topic: Funding Initiatives

Week Nine: 3/9 Topic: Case Study

Week Ten: 3/23 Topic: Case Study

Week Eleven: 3/30 Topic: Case Study

Week Twelve: 4/6 Topic: Case Study

Week Thirteen: 4/13 Topic: Practical Tools for Successful Collaboration

Week Fourteen: 4/20 Presentation of projects

Week Fifteen: 4/27 Presentation of projects/credos.

Week Sixteen: 5/4 Celebration of Community

• Instructor reserves the right to change topic order.

X. REQUIRED TEXTBOOK

Chrislip, D. (2002). The collaborative leadership fieldbook. San Francisco, CA: Jossey
-Bass.

XI. BIBLIOGRAPHY

Chrislip, D. and Larson, C. (1994). Collaborative leadership: How citizens and civic leaders can make a difference. San Francisco, CA: Jossey
-Bass.

De Pree, M. (1997). Leading without power: Finding hope in serving community. San Francisco, CA: Jossey
-Bass.

Drucker Foundation (1998). The community of the future. San Francisco, CA: Jossey
-Bass.

Gardner, J. (1991). Building community. Washington, D.C.: Independent Sector.

Gardner, J. (2003). Living, leading, and the American dream. San Francisco, CA: Jossey
-Bass.

Kretzmann, J. and McKnight, J. (1997). Building communities from the inside out: A path toward finding and mobilizing a community’s assets. Evanston, IL:
ACTA Publications.

Loeb, P. (1999). Soul of a citizen: Living with conviction in a cynical time. New
York, NY: St. Martin’s Press.

Mattessich, P. and Monsey, B. ( 1997). Community building: What makes it work. A review of factors influencing successful community building. St. Paul, MN: Wilder Research Center.

Putnam, R. (2000). Bowling alone: The collapse and revival of American community. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Sagawa, S., Segal, E. and Kanter, M. (2000). Common interest, common good: Creating value through business and social sector partnerships. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Shore, B. (1999). The cathedral within: Transforming your life by giving something back. New York: Random House.

Straus, D. and Layton, T. (2002). How to make collaboration work: Powerful ways to build consensus, solve problems, and make decisions. San Francisco, CA: Berrett
-Koehler Publishers.

XII. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Websites

American Democracy Project for Civic Engagement
www.nytimes.com/ref/college/collegespecial2/coll_aascu_part.html

Amherst H. Wilder Foundation
www.wilder.org

Ashoka
www.changemakers.net

Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation
www.emkf.org

Foundation Center
http://fdncenter.org

Learn & Serve Corporation for National and Community Service
www.learnandserve.org

National Service Learning Clearinghouse
www.servicelearning.org

Search Institute
www.search
-institute.org

Share Our Strength
www.strength.org

Social Capital
www.worldbank.org/poverty/scapital
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TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY – CORPUS CHRISTI



!! COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
COURSE SYLLABUS – SPRING 2005
EDLD 6342



Professor: Dr. Diana K. Wenzel Course Credit: 3 semester hours
Office: Faculty Center 224 Course Number: EDLD 6342
Telephone: 361.825.6017 Location: CCH 262
E-mail: dwenzel@falcon.tamucc.edu

Office Hours: Tuesday 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Other times by appointment.


I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course develops collaborative leadership skills related to initiating and implementing school and community partnerships. A special focus is the enhancement of critical literacy skills – the capacity to read and interpret events within the socio-political context of community-embedded educational leadership.

II. RATIONALE

In a global society, the complexity of issues is beyond the capacity of any one entity to address singularly. These global impacts ultimately affect children and families at the community level. Current economic and political trends dictate that citizens and service providers develop increasingly effective means of leveraging limited resources. Community-based collaborations are proliferating. These collaborations necessitate the development of leadership skills and capacities that use new forms of power, communication, policy development, organizational infrastructure, systems thinking, economic diversity, and commitment. In order to create or meaningfully contribute to sustainable partnerships, today’s educational leader must hone new skill sets. The purpose of this course is to facilitate the types of learning experiences, within the community, that will immerse students in developing or expanding these critical collaborative leadership capacities.

III. STATE ADOPTED PROFICIENCIES (Not Applicable)

IV. ExCET STANDARDS (Not Applicable)


V. COURSE OBJECTIVES

Throughout the course, students will:

• Partner with agencies, organizations, businesses, foundations, or other institutions to address critical community issues;

• Participate in shared decision-making processes;

• Analyze community issues from multiple perspectives;

• Integrate service learning experiences with readings on leadership, community, civic engagement, societal trends, and service;

• Develop leadership skills through the application of leadership theories in a community setting;

• Engage in civic projects focused on the resolution of community needs;

• Facilitate group processes that have the propensity to mobilize citizens toward meeting intended goals;

• Seek to generate and allocate resources as a means of meeting specified community priorities and objectives;

• Reflect critically on personal and professional development in the collaborative leadership arena.


Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to demonstrate:

• An understanding of the process through which one identifies community needs, analyzes stakeholder interests, builds alliances, and mobilizes community members to resolve issues and meet the needs of constituencies;

• Practical applications of collaborative leadership and cooperative learning models and processes (constructivist leadership);

• Service learning principles and civic engagement best practices.






VI. COURSE TOPICS

Community Capacity Building
Leadership
Social Capital
Civic Engagement
Socio-Political Context
Social Entrepreneurism
Community Involvement in School Improvement
Grant Seeking & Funding Resources
Community Power Structures
Service Learning
Asset vs. Deficit Approaches

VII. INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS AND ACTIVITIES

Seminars
Site Visits
Case Studies
Group Projects
Reflective Journaling
Portfolio Development
Cooperative Learning Teams

VIII. EVALUATION AND GRADE ASSIGNMENT

Grading Scale

A = 540-600 points
B = 480-539 points
C = 420-479 points
D = 360-419 points
F = 300-359 points

• Late assignments will only be accepted in the case of a true emergency (with advance notification and instructor approval).

Assignment #1 (100 points)
Written literature review related to a chosen social or community issue (due 3/23/05).

Assignment #2 (150 points)
Weekly reflections (10 points per reflection).

Assignment #3 (100 points)
Grant, research, or collaboration proposal (due 4/20/05).
Assignment #4 (100 points)
Community leadership credo (due 4/27/05)

Class Attendance and Participation (150 points)
While it is understood that students have personal and professional responsibilities to fulfill during the term of this course, regular and punctual attendance is expected. Absences will result in a grade reduction of 10 points per absence. Students are expected to actively participate in class projects and discussions. There will be no make-up assignments.

IX. COURSE SCHEDULE AND POLICIES

Week One: 1/12 Course and syllabus overview. Topic: Community

Week Two: 1/19 Topic: Civic Engagement and Social Capital

Week Three: 1/26 Topic: Service Learning

Week Four: 2/2 Topic: Community Assets

Week Five: 2/9 Topic: Social Entrepreneurism

Week Six: 2/16 Topic: Models of Collaboration

Week Seven: 2/23 Topic: Processes of Collaboration

Week Eight: 3/2 Topic: Funding Initiatives

Week Nine: 3/9 Topic: Case Study

Week Ten: 3/23 Topic: Case Study

Week Eleven: 3/30 Topic: Case Study

Week Twelve: 4/6 Topic: Case Study

Week Thirteen: 4/13 Topic: Practical Tools for Successful Collaboration

Week Fourteen: 4/20 Presentation of projects

Week Fifteen: 4/27 Presentation of projects/credos.

Week Sixteen: 5/4 Celebration of Community

• Instructor reserves the right to change topic order.

X. REQUIRED TEXTBOOK

Chrislip, D. (2002). The collaborative leadership fieldbook. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

XI. BIBLIOGRAPHY

Chrislip, D. and Larson, C. (1994). Collaborative leadership: How citizens and civic leaders can make a difference. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

De Pree, M. (1997). Leading without power: Finding hope in serving community. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Drucker Foundation (1998). The community of the future. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Gardner, J. (1991). Building community. Washington, D.C.: Independent Sector.

Gardner, J. (2003). Living, leading, and the American dream. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Kretzmann, J. and McKnight, J. (1997). Building communities from the inside out: A path toward finding and mobilizing a community’s assets. Evanston, IL:
ACTA Publications.

Loeb, P. (1999). Soul of a citizen: Living with conviction in a cynical time. New
York, NY: St. Martin’s Press.

Mattessich, P. and Monsey, B. ( 1997). Community building: What makes it work. A review of factors influencing successful community building. St. Paul, MN: Wilder Research Center.

Putnam, R. (2000). Bowling alone: The collapse and revival of American community. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Sagawa, S., Segal, E. and Kanter, M. (2000). Common interest, common good: Creating value through business and social sector partnerships. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Shore, B. (1999). The cathedral within: Transforming your life by giving something back. New York: Random House.

Straus, D. and Layton, T. (2002). How to make collaboration work: Powerful ways to build consensus, solve problems, and make decisions. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

XII. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Websites

American Democracy Project for Civic Engagement
www.nytimes.com/ref/college/collegespecial2/coll_aascu_part.html

Amherst H. Wilder Foundation
www.wilder.org

Ashoka
www.changemakers.net

Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation
www.emkf.org

Foundation Center
http://fdncenter.org

Learn & Serve Corporation for National and Community Service
www.learnandserve.org

National Service Learning Clearinghouse
www.servicelearning.org

Search Institute
www.search-institute.org

Share Our Strength
www.strength.org

Social Capital
www.worldbank.org/poverty/scapital