SGarza.BeforeReadingConnors4 History

Hide minor edits - Show changes to output - Cancel

Added lines 102-112:

'''Yvette E.'''

Style Theory and Static Abstractions (chapter 6)

The style theory may deal with how people develop a certain style; why they carry a certain tone, voice, diction, rhythm to the writing. Each person, with enough writing practice, develops an individual style, which can be influenced by culture, ethnicity, race, sex, education, demographic, geographic location and so on. However, as far as Static Abstractions, I have no idea what those could idea.

Invention and Assignments in Composition-Rhetoric (chapter 7)

Invention .maybe this text will be about how teachers are constantly inventing new things in the classroom, now pedagogies, new teaching methods, new teaching styles, new lesson ..who knows? Or maybe just focusing on the brainstorming step in the writing process???
Added lines 99-101:
--------
'''Marilyn'''
I am not too sure what is in these last two chapters. I think that chapter 6 will be more about the development of stylistic criticism in rhetoric. I also see a heading that says: "The Decline of Stylistic Composition", so I am guessing that will be about the declining popularity of stylistic criticism in rhetoric. I don't really know though. As for chapter seven, I think this might contain information about trends in composition and rhetoric regarding assignments. I see another heading sbout the decline of something. I am paticularly interested in the section titled, "Backlash against personal writing."
Changed lines 92-98 from:
-----
to:
-----

'''Jennifer Guerra'''

Reading for Connors Monday 23rd

I am looking forward to these last two chapters in Connors (aside from the fact that they complete the book), but I am hoping that he completes the puzzle or answers the last few questions he has posed throughout. What exactly is composition now and how did it get to where it is? We have looked at texts and much of history, but I am still waiting to find out where exactly Connors thinks we are now, he has constantly made reference to covering this , well were here and I am waiting to see where is. I still expect the flashbacks and hope he can finds a semi linear path to the closing of the book.
Changed lines 2-13 from:
to:
!!Kathy H
*Before Reading Connors: Style Theory and Static Abstractions

Writing style includes things like diction, emphasis, figurative language, imagery, and other rhetorical devices. A style reflects individualism and how he/she uses different devices to create the prose or poetry they are striving to produce (things like suspense, terror, sympathy, etc.) Style can also be categorized in regard to a literary period such as , or by a particular author, such as Edgar Allan Poe. I have no idea what are; not a clue.

*Kathy H
Before Reading Connors and Assignments in Comp-

Invention creating something in mind, is part of the writing process. It is stimulated by something read or experienced, and can be simple or complex. (Nothing-in/ nothing-out) Assignments given in composition classes are generally meant to stimulate thought/conversation and hopefully help students devise a topic on which to write about.

----
Added lines 77-81:
-----
'''[+%color=violet%Andrea Montalvo+]'''

While I'm not quite sure what these chapters are about, I think chapter six will mainly discuss the theory of style in rhet/comp. I have no idea what static abstractions could be. When I think of static, I think of static cling or static on the phone, so I'm not sure how this pertains to composition. As for chapter seven, I think it will be about developing assignments for the rhet/comp curriculum. These chapters will more than likely be like what we've read so far, in that Connors will provide a thorough history of how these concepts developed. Let's see...
-----
Added lines 67-76:

-----

'''James'''

I figure that the chapter on style theory will have something to do with the idea of teaching style to composition students and also the history of how that has evolved. I expect for it to follow the same historical arc we have observed in previous chapters in explaining how style has gone from being more defined and more teachable in a standardized and conventional way based on presumptions of student knowledge to being less defined and less teachable since standards and conventions of uniform preexisting knowledge (of students) have become less and less presumed.

I don't know what a static abstraction is; I don't recall ever hearing that term mentioned.

I don't really know what the author is talking about when he used the word "invention" in the title to Ch. 7. The word "assignments" gives me the idea that this chapter will be about the types of assignments given in comp-rhet classes and how the historical arc Connors portrays in his book has shaped these. I imagine that invention has something to do with this - I'm anxious to see how he is using that word.
Changed lines 60-66 from:
-----
to:
-----

****Michele Mora-Trevino*****

I'm not sure what I can expect from Connors' Ch. 6--Style Theory and Static Abstractions. I guess the Style Theory may discuss those attributes that are associated to various composition theories. I am not familiar with the phrase "static abstractions."

Invention and Assignments in Composition-Rhetoric, Connors' Ch 7, is completely foreign to me. However, based on Connors' previous chapters, I can be sure that it will include some type of historical review.
Added lines 51-59:
-----

*'''Lorena N.'''

'''Connors Chapter 6&7'''

I'm not familiar with style theory and static abstractions, but my guess would be that this chapter will deal will the history of these ideas and how they relate to pedagogy and rhetoric.

Chapter 7, Inventions and Assignments in Compositions-Rhetoric, will possibly discuss the evolution of writing assignment in the classroom and teacher's struggles with chosing topics for composition. This is just a guess of course because I am not familiar with these topics.
Deleted lines 0-4:
'''John L. - Before Connors'''

You have asked us to read Connors Chapter 6: Theory and Static and Chapter 7: and Assignments in Composition-Rhetoric. I am unaware of the term theory, although I would imagine the theory suggests that a knowledge of style in a paper will inevitably lead to greater success in writing. It may focus on the proper inclusion or exclusion of grammar, spelling, and punctuation in the text.

Chapter 7 sounds like a practicum on how to begin teaching composition and rhetoric to freshman what assignments will be the most useful. It may also discuss the value of novelty in assignments, as to avoid the impression that the only benefit of the course is to teach the five paragraph essay.
Changed lines 3-7 from:
!!!!Michelle G

Chapters 6&7

I honestly have no idea what these chapters will discuss...I
'm not sure I know anything about Static Abstractions as far as Compositions Studies would define them...From the tile of chapter 6 (and some looking through), it will probably talk about vernacular in terms of writing--static abstractions, I would guess, are (or it may have been believed were) the elements of rhetoric/vernacular. As for chapter 7, I have abosolutely no clues. Sorry...I even skimmed the subtitles and I got nothing...ha I don't know if it has to do with inventions in compostion pedagogies, in composition itself or if "Invention" itself is a kind of strategy for writing/teaching. Maybe it's one or all of these...?
to:
Steve S.

Upon looking into the last few chapters of Connors, I don
't think I'm ready to commit to a detailed analysis of these titles yet. More than likely, we'll learn more from the familiar approach we've seen from Connors: a back study through rhetorical history, certain comments on why Connors thinks the theory evolved, but in specific I'll wait and see.

"Style Theory and Static Abstractions" indicates only a few possibilities to me so far. He may be approaching style as far as individual teaching goes, or he could be approaching it as a means of reaching the students with the pedagogy. "Static Abstractions" could mean just about anything, though, other than it's fixed and seems nebulous
. So this could be a chapter about how to stylistically approach very fixed and abstract content. Or else I could be completely wrong and Connors has something else in mind.

"Invention and Assignments in Composition-Rhetoric" sounds more concrete to me. Invention could mean the process of developing new pedagogical strategies, as well as approaches of how to give assignments to the students. Perhaps with Connors, we may see how the writing assignment evolved, and the theories and internal debates about how much to give the students, what to give them, and so on.

Or so I would guess. I may see something totally different when I'm done, of course...
Changed lines 16-20 from:
!!!Darcy L.

For
Connors, I remember much about the Theory and Static chapter. In terms of education, I think style theory means that people learn in different ways. This would make sense coming off of the Discourse Taxonomies chapter in which there were many from which to analyze how different students might process (or not process) and interpret the modes of discourse. Not all students write well based on directed prompts, and likewise a lot of students simply cannot sit down and write without one.

Hopefully and will cover different classroom practices. For me, things really crystallize until I can see it from a perspective or a application
to the classroom. I think he has covered this throughout the book, but having it in one place and in a somewhat linear fashion timeline-wise would be helpful.
to:
'''John L. - Before Connors'''

You have asked us to read Connors Chapter 6: Theory and Static and Chapter 7: and Assignments in Composition-Rhetoric. I am unaware of the term theory, although I would imagine the theory suggests that a knowledge of style in a paper will inevitably lead
to greater success in writing. It may focus on the proper inclusion or exclusion of grammar, spelling, and punctuation in the text.

Chapter 7 sounds like a practicum on how to begin teaching composition and rhetoric to freshman what assignments will be the most useful. It may also discuss the value of novelty in assignments, as to avoid the impression that the only benefit of the course is
to teach the five paragraph essay.
Added lines 23-36:
!!!!Michelle G

Chapters 6&7

I honestly have no idea what these chapters will discuss...I'm not sure I know anything about Static Abstractions as far as Compositions Studies would define them...From the tile of chapter 6 (and some looking through), it will probably talk about vernacular in terms of writing--static abstractions, I would guess, are (or it may have been believed were) the elements of rhetoric/vernacular. As for chapter 7, I have abosolutely no clues. Sorry...I even skimmed the subtitles and I got nothing...ha I don't know if it has to do with inventions in compostion pedagogies, in composition itself or if "Invention" itself is a kind of strategy for writing/teaching. Maybe it's one or all of these...?
----

!!!Darcy L.

For Connors, I remember much about the Theory and Static chapter. In terms of education, I think style theory means that people learn in different ways. This would make sense coming off of the Discourse Taxonomies chapter in which there were many from which to analyze how different students might process (or not process) and interpret the modes of discourse. Not all students write well based on directed prompts, and likewise a lot of students simply cannot sit down and write without one.

Hopefully and will cover different classroom practices. For me, things really crystallize until I can see it from a perspective or a application to the classroom. I think he has covered this throughout the book, but having it in one place and in a somewhat linear fashion timeline-wise would be helpful.
----
Added lines 28-36:
-----

'''Sami H.'''

'''Before Connors chapter 6 & 7'''

My mind is drawing a blank on style theory and static abstractions. My only guess will be that Connors will discuss the histories of style theory and static abstractions. Hopefully it will be as informative as the previous chapters.
As for inventions and assignments in comp.rhet.,I'm sure that the chapter will give the histories behind inventions and assignments. It should be interesting how the both invention and assignments evolved into what we are familiar with today in composition rhetoric.
-----
Changed lines 20-27 from:
to:
----

'''Holly C. - Before Reading Connors'''

I am not certain of what the content of the final two chapters of Connors will cover specifically. For the sixth chapter, I am assuming that the discussion will be about either the different styles that are acceptable to teach in the field of Composition and Rhetoric or how to teach the different styles in Rhetoric and Composition. I am not certain if my second assumption is the correct one, as no part of this book has been about how to teach any one aspect of rhetoric and composition. From my study of the first five chapters of the book, I am also assuming that Connors will again be making discussion of how the field of Rhetoric deteriorated in the nineteenth century due to the increasing student population in college.

The seventh chapter of the book is the last chapter of the book. I am assuming that I will be very happy to finish reading it. I am not certain of what the title, and , means specifically. Perhaps Connors is going to make discussions about the different types of assignments that are used to teach Rhetoric and Composition. I wonder if his tone about these assignments will be disdainful, as he does seem to border very strongly disliking the changes that occurred in Rhetoric and Composition during the nineteenth century.
Added lines 13-20:
----

!!!Darcy L.

For Connors, I remember much about the Theory and Static chapter. In terms of education, I think style theory means that people learn in different ways. This would make sense coming off of the Discourse Taxonomies chapter in which there were many from which to analyze how different students might process (or not process) and interpret the modes of discourse. Not all students write well based on directed prompts, and likewise a lot of students simply cannot sit down and write without one.

Hopefully and will cover different classroom practices. For me, things really crystallize until I can see it from a perspective or a application to the classroom. I think he has covered this throughout the book, but having it in one place and in a somewhat linear fashion timeline-wise would be helpful.
Changed line 12 from:
I honestly have no idea what these chapters will discuss...I'm not sure I know anything about Static Abstractions as far as Compositions Studies would define them...From the tile of chapter 6 (and some looking through), it will probably talk about vernacular in terms of writing--static abstractions, I would guess, are (or it may have been believed were) the elements of rhetoric/vernacular. As far as chapter 7, I have abosolutely no clues. Sorry...I even skimmed the subtitles and I got nothing...ha I don't know if it has to do with inventions in compostion pedagogies, in composition itself or if "Invention" itself is a kind of strategy for writing/teaching. Maybe it's one or all of these...?
to:
I honestly have no idea what these chapters will discuss...I'm not sure I know anything about Static Abstractions as far as Compositions Studies would define them...From the tile of chapter 6 (and some looking through), it will probably talk about vernacular in terms of writing--static abstractions, I would guess, are (or it may have been believed were) the elements of rhetoric/vernacular. As for chapter 7, I have abosolutely no clues. Sorry...I even skimmed the subtitles and I got nothing...ha I don't know if it has to do with inventions in compostion pedagogies, in composition itself or if "Invention" itself is a kind of strategy for writing/teaching. Maybe it's one or all of these...?
Changed line 12 from:
I honestly have no idea what these chapters will discuss...I'm not sure I know anything about Static Abstractions as far as Compositions Studies would define them...From the tile of chapter 6 (and some looking through), it will probably talk about vernacular in terms of writing--static abstractions, I would guess, are things which (as it may have been believed were) the elements of rhetoric/vernacular. As far as chapter 7, I have abosolutely no clues. Sorry...I even skimmed the subtitles and I got nothing...ha I don't know if it has to do with inventions in compostion pedagogies, in composition itself or if "Invention" itself is a kind of strategy for writing/teaching. Maybe it's one or all of these...?
to:
I honestly have no idea what these chapters will discuss...I'm not sure I know anything about Static Abstractions as far as Compositions Studies would define them...From the tile of chapter 6 (and some looking through), it will probably talk about vernacular in terms of writing--static abstractions, I would guess, are (or it may have been believed were) the elements of rhetoric/vernacular. As far as chapter 7, I have abosolutely no clues. Sorry...I even skimmed the subtitles and I got nothing...ha I don't know if it has to do with inventions in compostion pedagogies, in composition itself or if "Invention" itself is a kind of strategy for writing/teaching. Maybe it's one or all of these...?
Changed lines 10-11 from:
Chapters 6&7 (finally...haha)
to:
Chapters 6&7
Changed lines 5-12 from:
Chapter 7 sounds like a practicum on how to begin teaching composition and rhetoric to freshman what assignments will be the most useful. It may also discuss the value of novelty in assignments, as to avoid the impression that the only benefit of the course is to teach the five paragraph essay.
to:
Chapter 7 sounds like a practicum on how to begin teaching composition and rhetoric to freshman what assignments will be the most useful. It may also discuss the value of novelty in assignments, as to avoid the impression that the only benefit of the course is to teach the five paragraph essay.
----

!!!!Michelle G

Chapters 6&7 (finally...haha)

I honestly have no idea what these chapters will discuss...I'm not sure I know anything about Static Abstractions as far as Compositions Studies would define them...From the tile of chapter 6 (and some looking through), it will probably talk about vernacular in terms of writing--static abstractions, I would guess, are things which (as it may have been believed were) the elements of rhetoric/vernacular. As far as chapter 7, I have abosolutely no clues. Sorry...I even skimmed the subtitles and I got nothing...ha I don't know if it has to do with inventions in compostion pedagogies, in composition itself or if "Invention" itself is a kind of strategy for writing/teaching. Maybe it's one or all of these...?
Added lines 1-5:
'''John L. - Before Connors'''

You have asked us to read Connors Chapter 6: Theory and Static and Chapter 7: and Assignments in Composition-Rhetoric. I am unaware of the term theory, although I would imagine the theory suggests that a knowledge of style in a paper will inevitably lead to greater success in writing. It may focus on the proper inclusion or exclusion of grammar, spelling, and punctuation in the text.

Chapter 7 sounds like a practicum on how to begin teaching composition and rhetoric to freshman what assignments will be the most useful. It may also discuss the value of novelty in assignments, as to avoid the impression that the only benefit of the course is to teach the five paragraph essay.