SGarza.BeforeReadingTate3 History

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* Do I know anything about this topic?
I think collaborative pedagogy will consists of a variety of teaching methods that take place in the classroom.
* Do I know anything about this author?
I know anything about these authors.
* What preconceived notions do I have about the reading?
I think it will have a lot to do with the way teachers approach the classrooms. There are certain things that work and perhaps they will be shared in this chapter.
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Well, I can not say that I am familiar with Rebecca Moore Howard, Diana George, or John Trimbur. Collaborative pedagogy, is however, a term that I have heard before in education classes. I guess a goal for any school would be to have a successful, collaborative pedagogy. As for cultural studies and comp., I have become aware of how important it is to acknowledge the relationship between the two. I'm sure the writers will fully dissect each topic.
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Well, I can not say that I am familiar with Rebecca Moore Howard, Diana George, or John Trimbur. Collaborative pedagogy, is however, a term that I have heard before in education classes. I guess a goal for any school would be to have a successful, collaborative pedagogy. As for cultural studies and comp., I have become aware of how important it is to acknowledge the relationship between the two. I'm sure the writers will fully dissect each topic.

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'''Marilyn'''
Before Tate-
I have never heard of Rebecca Moore Howard. I think that collaborative pedagogy will be a way of teaching writing that involves collaboration. Maybe a collaborative prewriting, revising or publishing process.
Last semester I did a presentation on Cultural Studies. I think the article was by Franco. In this article by Franco, cultural studies centered around pop-sub-cultural groups that formed in response to political and social situations. We shall see if the two articles have anything in common
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'''Sami H.'''

Before reading Tate

Well, I can not say that I am familiar with Rebecca Moore Howard, Diana George, or John Trimbur. Collaborative pedagogy, is however, a term that I have heard before in education classes. I guess a goal for any school would be to have a successful, collaborative pedagogy. As for cultural studies and comp., I have become aware of how important it is to acknowledge the relationship between the two. I'm sure the writers will fully dissect each topic.
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Cultural Studies and composition:''
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''Cultural Studies and composition:''
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'''Jennifer G'''

Pre-reading Tate

''Collaborative pedagogy''

Once again I do not know about the author, however the text seems fairly concise and clear in the other readings and selections it has provided. I have been impressed at how well laid out everything has been, and if I had to guess at what this chapter will offer, I would guess it would be along the lines of working together.
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Cultural Studies and composition:''

Again not knowing who the author is, however the idea of cultural studies fascinates me. I have taken several courses in intercultural communication and ethnography, and have been drawn in by authors like Hall and Goffman. I love the approach of material from the cultural standpoint and look to pursue this more as I work through grad school.
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* nota bene: I have not previously read anything from these authors (at least that I can remember)
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'''[+%color=hotpink%Andrea Montalvo+]'''

'''Collaborative Pedagogy:''' I would assume this essay discusses how teachers can have their students work together to write collaboratively. Perhaps the author will mention writing groups, or other instances where students might work together to write an essay. I think this should be an interesting chapter, seeing as how my seminar students are in writing groups and seem to be getting along great and working collaboratively. However, I'm sure the author will also provide scenarios where students couldn't or wouldn't work together to complete their assignment, so I'm curious to see how the author handled this.

'''Cultural Studies and Composition:''' Well obviously this essay deals with cultural studies, something we've yet to discuss in this class. However, when I think of cultural studies, I think of literature, so I'm curious how the author would apply this to composition. Although, I'm sure there has to be some reading assignments in a composition class, whether its a poem or a short article. I think students should be introduced to cultural studies (especially with the melting pot or salad bowl, whichever you prefer, of the USA) because it will help them see how some texts are biased. Let's see...
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Steve S.

"Collaborative Pedagogy" is a new one on me, must admit. I can only guess that involves some kind of dynamic process between the teacher and either the students or some third party. That could possibly connect back to all the discussion of expressivism that we've already done, since it is very much a student-based form. However, I'm really not sure on this one.

Cultural Studies strikes me as familiar, though it's not a track I've held great interest in. It might be that this connects back to borderland theory, which I've run across before. (And in fact only addressed a couple of weeks ago in tutoring, where we discussed Anzaldua and her influence on teaching writing.) Likely, I'll end up seeing connections all over the place again as I read, but we'll see.

I'm not familiar with these authors off the top of my head, but I'll have a different view of them once I get to my post-reading post...


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*'''Lorena'''

Maybe Collaborative Pedagogy will be a cooperation of different styles working together for the common good of both teachers and writers. I'm not sure what it is but I hope my assumption is correct!

Cultural Studies and Composition might discuss how different groups of people use composition within the classroom; discussing possibly how both teachers and students view composition and the techniques they employ. It might also discuss different texts from authors with varying cultural backgrounds and the rules and ideals concerning composition they deem important.
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'''John L. Before Tate'''

You have asked us to read by Rebecca Moore Howard (pp. 54-70) and Studies and by Diana George and John Trimbur (pp. 71-91).

Terms like and make my skin crawl in terms of composition. In certain scientific studies (including those dealing with linguistics), collaboration is very necessary between partners. Sometimes when the partnership duties are strictly delineated, they can work as well. But always very suspicious being asked to work in groups to write. Not necessarily because I like/trust/respect my partners, but because ownership of a piece of writing gives a certain pride.

On the other hand, I see little redeeming value to introducing cultural studies into composition in any circumstance. Cultural studies has a proper when reviewing literature. It does not have such in composition. It changes the entire premise of the course from writing to reading. The actual process of writing is abandoned so that students can find cultural biases in existing writing. If that is the purpose of composition, then composition is worthless as its own division of English studies.
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I would guess that this would incorporate more modern approaches to writing--taking into consideration today's methods of communication and how we "identify" ourselves within them (texting, blogging, etc) somehow....? I'm not even sure what that means, but let's go with that...ha Because it also may include issues of race and culture, I would think that this approach would encourage the use of multi-cultural texts and perspectives concerning identity. I've never read anything by these authors and I know pretty close to nothing about Cultural Studies--only what we had discussed in Critical Approaches eons ago...
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I would guess that this would incorporate more modern approaches to writing--taking into consideration today's methods of communication and how we "identify" ourselves within them (texting, blogging, etc) somehow....? I'm not even sure what that means, but let's go with that...ha Because it also may include issues of race and culture, I would think that this approach would encourage the use of multi-cultural texts and perspectives concerning identity. I've never read anything by these authors and I know pretty close to nothing about Cultural Studies--only what we had discussed in Critical Approaches eons ago...

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'''Holly C.'''

I am assuming that chapter on is a discussion of utilizing teaching methods that encourage collaboration among students. The types of activities done in a collaborative manner would include peer editing, group discussion, and working together in order to produce a body of work. In education, there is currently a great emphasis on creating lessons that involve group collaboration. The rationale behind these types of activities is that all students going into the workforce will have to work in collaboration with other individuals at some point in their careers.

The chapter on Studies in is, more than likely, a a discussion of how certain aspects of culture should be approached within a composition classroom. I am making a guess that the ways that the author of this piece might suggest these issues be studied could be the use of culturally diverse texts. One of the ways that this author might suggest introducing culturally diverse texts into a Composition and Rhetoric classroom could be to have students read literary criticisms that are about feminist and post-colonial issues and also to have students read non-canonical literature by authors other than the typical White
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!!!!Michelle G

Collaborative Pedagogy:

I haven't heard of Rebecca Moore Howard or Collaborative Pedagogy--I haven't heard of a lot of things...ha. Based on the title, I thought that this would have a lot to do with group work and its assessment in the classroom, but after scanning through the subtitles and such, it seems that there are many different..."levels," or aspects of (?) Collaborative teaching. It seems that there are either different types of Collaborative teaching methods, or different aspects that all work together toward one purpose--collaborativly...;) It's more than just group work, it seems; it may also be about the individual and his/her collaboration with a text as well as his/her peers.

Cultural Studies and Composition:

I would guess that this would incorporate more modern approaches to writing--taking into consideration today's methods of communication and how we "identify" ourselves within them (texting, blogging, etc) somehow....? I'm not even sure what that means, but let's go with that...ha Because it also may include issues of race and culture, I would think that this approach would encourage the use of multi-cultural texts and perspectives concerning identity. I've never read anything by these authors and I know pretty close to nothing about Cultural Studies--only what we had discussed in Critical Approaches eons ago...
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'''Darcy L.'''

''Collaborative Pedagogy:''

I heard of collaborative pedagogy before, but it sounds like it might be talking about small groups and peer editing. Either that, or talking about the teacher being a collaborator with the students instead of the banking method where the teacher just lectures and the students receive the knowledge. That Freirian paradigm of teacher-students and student-teachers that we read in Pedagogy of the Oppressed last semester has stuck with me. I read anything by Rebecca Moore Howard yet, but I do hope this chapter gives more concrete examples of the classroom implementation of the pedagogy like the Process Pedagogy chapter did. Speaking about pedagogies in abstractions like the Rhetorical Pedagogy chapter makes it difficult for me to understand it in terms of pedagogy.

''Cultural Studies and Composition:''

Any preconceived ideas I have about cultural studies in the composition classroom revolve around the borderlands reading done so far, like Gloria to Tame a Wild Tongue. Especially in the context of our reading in Basic Writing this week, too, this seems to speak to approaching dialects from a non-prescriptive perspective as the teacher and trying to be sensitive to the problems that speaking a non-standard dialect can create for a student in the traditional classroom. I would think this would also touch on expanding what we consider to be the canon of literature to include multi-cultural texts and perhaps even casting a wider net over what is considered literature, such as bringing in movies, song lyrics, etc. I read anything by either of these authors, but I remember name being mentioned in a previous chapter of this think in the Process Pedagogy chapter. That would lead me to believe that there is probably some overlap between this chapter and process and/or expressive pedagogies.