How do we predict what each reader is looking for?

  • By imagining our readers as needing to write our texts for themselves.
  • By searching for the cues that we may have placed in the text that might indicate point, purpose, and structure.
  • By learning to read our own writing critically for different features and purposes.

These steps can help us anticipate how readers will use our texts.

How do we test for reader-based text?

  • By making sure that our information is focused on what the reader needs or expects to find.
  • By asking ourselves what we want our reader to see, think, and do with our text.
  • By anticipating our reader's response.

Submitted by Joseph Mitchell


Tyler, Josh, and Jacob:

How do we predict what each reader is looking for?

  1. Not a narrative, but issues and ideas
  2. Create a hierarchy of ideas for the reader rather than telling them a story
  3. Write about the problems that employee's want outside input on

How do we test for reader based text?

  1. Testing your drafts against your initial plans
  2. Using cues to reveal this plan to a reader
  3. Keeping the promise you made in your writing
  4. Know who your reader is

1)

    * Using cues that restate your thesis
    * An outline to breakdown your thoughts
    * "I" is relative to the type of projects but can make important points

2)

    * Go through several revisions with other readers
    * Reading out loud

- John, Tye, Gilbert


1) Testing your drafts against your initial plans

2) Using clues to reveal this plan to a reader

3) Keeping the promise you made in your writing

4) Know who your reader is


How do we predict what each reader is looking for?

  • By putting yourself in their shoes
  • Ask the reader what they intend to find in the report
  • Do not focus on "I"
  • Do not use a narrative organization
  • Focus the reader's attention
  • Stay away from textbook or survey organization

How do we test for reader based?

  • Compare the drafts to the plan for writing to determine if it follows the same format
  • Use clues that reveal your plan to the reader
  • Keep your promises to the reader
  • Determine who the audience is
  • Make headings for each topic to guide the reader through
  • Make sure that it is easy to navigate

Submitted by: Karthik, Katherine, and Kris


Visual Rhetoric

  • White space
  • Emphasis - bolding, underlining
  • Bullets
  • Indenting/spacing/Centering
  • Font
  • Color
  • Images
  • Alignment
  • Line/dashes

Using Sources

  • How does this source, this information lend credibility to my discussion?
  • How can I tell my reader where to go to get more info on the sources/information?
  • How do I decide when to use a quote?
    • Has the author of the quote said something in such a way that it will lose some of its meaning if I summarize it?
    • Does the way the author stated the information provide great simplicity, or great impact, so that I need to use the exact words?
    • If I use the quote will it make sense out of context?
    • Even if it needs context, can I provide a quick context for the quote so that is makes sense to the reader?
  • How do I decide when to summarize?
    • When I need to restate the information so that it will make sense to the reader because the reader doesn't have the full context of the information.