SGarza.EmilysResponseToGeorge History

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Emily you have some good points. However, I am not sure that I completely agree with your statement, the grand scheme of a undergraduate education, the average non-English major college student will take a freshman composition course, and that will be the end of that student's improvement in writing, most likely . Working in the writing center I have encountered numerous students from other disciplines such as, nursing, business, history, and science. I believe visual technology is a way to enhance an individuals learning experience. After all writing and visuals are both considered art, and are a way to communicate or express something. To answer your question, should the already undervalued composition course give away some of its time and assignments to include visual literacy, when it could be replaced with a different type of writing assignment intended to be fun for ? Maybe composition is undervalued because of its unwillingness to evolve into areas such as technology. Our field is behind and needs to keep up with the times, if the English field wants to continue it existence.
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Emily you have some good points. However, I am not sure that I completely agree with your statement, the grand scheme of a undergraduate education, the average non-English major college student will take a freshman composition course, and that will be the end of that student's improvement in writing, most likely . Working in the writing center I have encountered numerous students from other disciplines such as, nursing, business, history, and science. I believe visual technology is a way to enhance an individuals learning experience. After all writing and visuals are both considered art, and are a way to communicate or express something. To answer your question, should the already undervalued composition course give away some of its time and assignments to include visual literacy, when it could be replaced with a different type of writing assignment intended to be fun for ? Maybe composition is undervalued because of its unwillingness to evolve into areas such as technology. Our field is behind and needs to keep up with the times, if the English field wants to continue it existence.

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Response from Wendy

I had some of the same thoughts as Michelle, maybe because we're both looking at this from the perspective of journalists. Taken one step further, visual design is as much a part of the process of communication as text - which is what George was saying. Michelle's example of the newspaper page is an excellent one. If the people in the accompanying photo are facing the wrong way, the article has less chance of being read. If paragraphs are incredibly long and black, chances are high they'll be skipped. If a serious article has a lot of extra white space around it, the tendency is to consider it not so important. In short, the way the page looks as compared to our expectations regarding medium, subject matter, etc. communicates a lot about how we will interpret and integrate the words provided. Something else I've learned through graphic arts school is that if you want to effectively communicate with written text, you have to be able to communicate effectively with the visual text. People will only read what you've written if they see (literally) a reason to be interested. To me, this is as fundamentally important as learning how to write text effectively so my feelings are that it should be an important part of the composition class.
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Emily I think you make a valid point, but I would have to agree with you as well as disagree with you. I agree with your comment on freshman students taking other classes that require much more visual learning methods, but I disagree with your comment, "why should the already undervalued composition course give away some of its time and assignments to include visual literacy, when it could be replaced with a different type of writing assignment intended to be fun for students." I think adding visual learning to composition would make it more interesting for students who aleady dread the writing process. I didn't think about it until someone mentioned it to me, but I have to deal with this on a daily basis in the newsroom. When reporters sit down to write an article, we have to think about the entire story package which includes photographs, break out boxes or designs, and actually the more the better. We have to not only make the article interesting for the reader, so they actually read the entire thing, but we also have to make it visually appealing. The reader is drawn in by the vsual aspect and if that is appealing will continue to read the material. This is why I think the visual learning in composition would benefit the student's expereince. If they are thinking of more than just writing by how can they can enhance their writing with visuals, it will help to create a positive environment for writing in general.
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Emily I think you make a valid point, but I would have to agree with you as well as disagree with you. I agree with your comment on freshman students taking other classes that require much more visual learning methods, but I disagree with your comment, "why should the already undervalued composition course give away some of its time and assignments to include visual literacy, when it could be replaced with a different type of writing assignment intended to be fun for students." I think adding visual learning to composition would make it more interesting for students who aleady dread the writing process. I didn't think about it until someone mentioned it to me, but I have to deal with this on a daily basis in the newsroom. When reporters sit down to write an article, we have to think about the entire story package which includes photographs, break out boxes or designs, and actually the more the better. We have to not only make the article interesting for the reader, so they actually read the entire thing, but we also have to make it visually appealing. The reader is drawn in by the vsual aspect and if that is appealing will continue to read the material. This is why I think the visual learning in composition would benefit the student's expereince. If they are thinking of more than just writing by how can they can enhance their writing with visuals, it will help to create a positive environment for writing in general.
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Response from Melissa

Emily you have some good points. However, I am not sure that I completely agree with your statement, the grand scheme of a undergraduate education, the average non-English major college student will take a freshman composition course, and that will be the end of that student's improvement in writing, most likely . Working in the writing center I have encountered numerous students from other disciplines such as, nursing, business, history, and science. I believe visual technology is a way to enhance an individuals learning experience. After all writing and visuals are both considered art, and are a way to communicate or express something. To answer your question, should the already undervalued composition course give away some of its time and assignments to include visual literacy, when it could be replaced with a different type of writing assignment intended to be fun for ? Maybe composition is undervalued because of its unwillingness to evolve into areas such as technology. Our field is behind and needs to keep up with the times, if the English field wants to continue it existence.
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I agree with George's idea of bringing visual literacy into the composition classroom, but I believe that it should be strictly limited. In the grand scheme of a undergraduate education, the average non-English major college student will take a freshman composition course, and that will be the end of that student's improvement in writing, most likely forever. This student will also take many business, marketing, communication, etc. classes that will require him/her to use and develop visual skills in all types of learning methods. It is not as if the composition class in the one place in which students will get the chance to use visual literacy, therefore why should the already undervalued composition course give away some of its time and assignments to include visual literacy, when it could be replaced with a different type of writing assignment intended to be fun for students? We cringe when we think about how student writing continues to worsen, therefore I believe the composition course should be very much devoted to improving writing skills. I believe that this article presents some fun and beneficial ways to promote learning that no doubt students will learn from, but perhaps visual literacy should be used in small doses.
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I agree with George's idea of bringing visual literacy into the composition classroom, but I believe that it should be strictly limited. In the grand scheme of a undergraduate education, the average non-English major college student will take a freshman composition course, and that will be the end of that student's improvement in writing, most likely forever. This student will also take many business, marketing, communication, etc. classes that will require him/her to use and develop visual skills in all types of learning methods. It is not as if the composition class in the one place in which students will get the chance to use visual literacy, therefore why should the already undervalued composition course give away some of its time and assignments to include visual literacy, when it could be replaced with a different type of writing assignment intended to be fun for students? We cringe when we think about how student writing continues to worsen, therefore I believe the composition course should be very much devoted to improving writing skills. I believe that this article presents some fun and beneficial ways to promote learning that no doubt students will learn from, but perhaps visual literacy should be used in small doses.

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'''Response from Michelle'''

Emily I think you make a valid point, but I would have to agree with you as well as disagree with you. I agree with your comment on freshman students taking other classes that require much more visual learning methods, but I disagree with your comment, "why should the already undervalued composition course give away some of its time and assignments to include visual literacy, when it could be replaced with a different type of writing assignment intended to be fun for students." I think adding visual learning to composition would make it more interesting for students who aleady dread the writing process. I didn't think about it until someone mentioned it to me, but I have to deal with this on a daily basis in the newsroom. When reporters sit down to write an article, we have to think about the entire story package which includes photographs, break out boxes or designs, and actually the more the better. We have to not only make the article interesting for the reader, so they actually read the entire thing, but we also have to make it visually appealing. The reader is drawn in by the vsual aspect and if that is appealing will continue to read the material. This is why I think the visual learning in composition would benefit the student's expereince. If they are thinking of more than just writing by how can they can enhance their writing with visuals, it will help to create a positive environment for writing in general.
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I agree with George's idea of bringing visual literacy into the composition classroom, but I believe that it should be strictly limited. In the grand scheme of a undergraduate education, the average non-English major college student will take a freshman composition course, and that will be the end of that student's improvement in writing, most likely forever. This student will also take many business, marketing, communication, etc. classes that will require him/her to use and develop visual skills in all types of learning methods. It is not as if the composition class in the one place in which students will get the chance to use visual literacy, therefore why should the already undervalued composition course give away some of its time and assignments to include visual literacy, when it could be replaced with a different type of writing assignment intended to be fun for students? We cringe when we think about how student writing continues to worsen, therefore I believe the composition course should be very much devoted to improving writing skills. I believe that this article presents some fun and beneficial ways to promote learning that no doubt students will learn from, but perhaps visual literacy should be used in small doses.