SGarza.HowDoesTheNationalWritingProjectHelpToPrepareCompositionTeachers History

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The encouragement of collaboration among peers is also a valuable resource. stronger professional voices, and collegial relationships, NWP teachers awaken to a sense of ( Wood and Lieberman 2000). In a field where collaboration is often difficult to maintain, the National Writing Project exhibits to teachers the idea that a teacher of writing is far better at their job if he or she is willing to respectfully and thoughtfully listen to the suggestions of others and also to implement those suggestions in their own writing classrooms.
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The encouragement of collaboration among peers is also a valuable resource. stronger professional voices, and collegial relationships, NWP teachers awaken to a sense of ( Wood and Lieberman 2000). In a field where collaboration is often difficult to maintain, the National Writing Project exhibits to teachers the idea that a teacher of writing is far better at their job if he or she is willing to respectfully and thoughtfully listen to the suggestions of others and also to implement those suggestions in their own writing classrooms.
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The National Writing Project is made up of sites that are housed in universities and colleges that, along with four-year degrees, also offer graduate level classes. According to a recent inspection of the National Writing website, there are approximately 209 sites. Each site offers a variety of support, activities, and in-service opportunities. In general, these opportunities vary from site to site.

One common educational opportunity found at each site is the summer institute. Called the Invitational Summer Institute, this program is an intensive four to six week workshop. The primary requirement in order to attend this workshop is that the individual have at least one year of teaching in a classroom. This classroom experience can be earned in either an elementary, secondary, or post-secondary classroom. The summer institute applicant must also be invited into the program.

As the program is held in the summer, it is often difficult to get individuals to attend these workshops. The average teacher not working on any type of graduate degree may be reluctant to sacrifice a month of summer. The average teacher working on a graduate degree may feel unable to commit so much time to a professional development class as they need to utilize their free time in the summer in order to complete additional classes toward completion of their degree.

In order to attract individuals falling in the category of both teacher and graduate student, the Summer Institutes often result in the participant being allowed to earn six hours of graduate credit without paying tuition. This action further demonstrates the National Writing Projects desire to create successful composition teachers at all levels of instruction, be it the elementary classroom, the secondary classroom, or beyond.

Additionally, the National Writing Project offers additional training and resources outside of the summer institutes to help the participants reach their potential as teachers of writing. These resources include:

* Access to the National Writing Project Website;
* Access to National Writing online publication E-Voice (Prior to 2006, this publication was simply titled );
* Weekend workshops and mini-institutes designed to provide members with refresher training and motivation;
* Online communications specific to the site and teaching assignment; and
* Access to the resources available at the 209 individual National Writing Project sites.

The National Writing Project also publishes numerous studies on the effectiveness of their program, and frequently assesses the methods utilized in providing teacher training to their members. The level of member involvement in follow-up studies and assessment opportunities is up to the individuals, but the NWP recognizes the importance of accountability in their efforts to prove and further the effectiveness of their program.

Of these resources, the most valuable benefit of being a member of the National Writing Project is treated as a professional and being valued for your thoughts and (Wood and Lieberman ). This feeling of professional accountability and validation allows National Writing Project participants to feel validated and empowered as not just teachers but, more importantly, teachers of writing that have voice and valued opinions within the fields of secondary and post-secondary composition instruction.

The encouragement of collaboration among peers is also a valuable resource. stronger professional voices, and collegial relationships, NWP teachers awaken to a sense of ( Wood and Lieberman 2000). In a field where collaboration is often difficult to maintain, the National Writing Project exhibits to teachers the idea that a teacher of writing is far better at their job if he or she is willing to respectfully and thoughtfully listen to the suggestions of others and also to implement those suggestions in their own writing classrooms.

One of the primary reasons that graduates of the National Writing Project have such faith in themselves as teachers and also in their fellow NWP colleagues it that all graduates of the institution are bestowed with the title . Becoming a graduate of the Summer Institute provides a participant with a certain amount of credibility and authority that they take with them into their educational institutions and classrooms. It them to take on leadership (Wood and Lieberman 2000).