SGarza.Intro History

Hide minor edits - Show changes to output - Cancel

Changed lines 3-4 from:
When I started teaching - high school students at the Alternative High School Center in Corpus Christi, I have to admit that I was a true believer of sticking to the traditional textbook, worksheets, and discussions to work ideas and communicate information. To be honest, my expectations of my students and myself were not very high because I had a preconceived definition of at-risk students. To be fair, most of these students did have issues to deal with that were much larger (such as being teenage parents, having to work to support their families, or dealing with court orders, probation officers, or worse, actual incarceration time) than reading "Macbeth" or writing a character sketch of Pony Boy in ''The Outsiders''. This is not saying that these students were not capable or less intelligent in successfully completing these types of assignments than any other students from a regular high school.
to:
When I started teaching - high school students at the Alternative High School Center in Corpus Christi, I have to admit that I was a true believer of sticking to the traditional textbook, worksheets, and discussions to work ideas and communicate information. To be honest, my expectations of my students and myself were not very high because I had a preconceived definition of at-risk students. To be fair, most of these students did have issues to deal with that were much larger (such as being teenage parents, having to work to support their families, or dealing with court orders, probation officers, or worse, actual incarceration time) than reading or writing a character sketch of Pony Boy in ''The Outsiders''. This is not saying that these students were not capable or less intelligent in successfully completing these types of assignments than any other students from a regular high school.
June 27, 2007, at 01:36 AM CST by 152.163.100.195 -
Changed lines 1-4 from:
%center%Your Face is in Myspace

When I started teaching - high school students at the Alternative High School Center in Corpus Christi, I have to admit that I was a true believer of sticking to the traditional textbook, worksheets, and discussions to work ideas and communicate information. To be honest, my expectations of my students and myself were not very high because I had a preconceived definition of at-risk students. To be fair, most of these students did have issues to deal with that were much larger (such as being teenage parents, having to work to support their families, or dealing with court orders, probation officers, or worse, actual incarceration time) than reading Macbeth or writing a character sketch of Pony Boy in The Outsiders. This is not saying that these students were not capable or less intelligent in successfully completing these types of assignments than any other students from a regular high school.
to:
%center%Your ''Face'' is in ''Myspace''

When I started teaching - high school students at the Alternative High School Center in Corpus Christi, I have to admit that I was a true believer of sticking to the traditional textbook, worksheets, and discussions to work ideas and communicate information. To be honest, my expectations of my students and myself were not very high because I had a preconceived definition of at-risk students. To be fair, most of these students did have issues to deal with that were much larger (such as being teenage parents, having to work to support their families, or dealing with court orders, probation officers, or worse, actual incarceration time) than reading "Macbeth" or writing a character sketch of Pony Boy in ''The Outsiders''. This is not saying that these students were not capable or less intelligent in successfully completing these types of assignments than any other students from a regular high school.
June 27, 2007, at 01:35 AM CST by 152.163.100.195 -
Added lines 1-9:
%center%Your Face is in Myspace

When I started teaching - high school students at the Alternative High School Center in Corpus Christi, I have to admit that I was a true believer of sticking to the traditional textbook, worksheets, and discussions to work ideas and communicate information. To be honest, my expectations of my students and myself were not very high because I had a preconceived definition of at-risk students. To be fair, most of these students did have issues to deal with that were much larger (such as being teenage parents, having to work to support their families, or dealing with court orders, probation officers, or worse, actual incarceration time) than reading Macbeth or writing a character sketch of Pony Boy in The Outsiders. This is not saying that these students were not capable or less intelligent in successfully completing these types of assignments than any other students from a regular high school.

However, due to lack of effective training on my part and a general lack of time on the part, I only created two assignments that required them to use a computer my first two years teaching. In my third year with the alternative high school, we received funding from the Corpus Christi Independent School District to purchase new computers, which meant more teacher workshops and training sessions that helped us develop assignments and activities to use in our lesson plans. When I was accepted into the First-Year Program at Texas A&M Christi to teach composition, I was introduced to my first classroom where every student had direct access to a computer without having to visit the library in order to type a paper or do research. This changed my perspective of teaching within a completely digitalized environment.

The increase of technology in the classroom is a blessing and a curse. On one hand, there is the ideal that teachers and students will actively incorporate and utilize this technology into their teaching and learning. Then there is the concern that more teachers will become dependent on it (i.e. use programs and interactive websites as the pedagogy) and that students will use it for something else that would not be considered learning (i.e. surfing the Internet, reading email, etc.). The fact remains that now more than ever students are entering the classroom with more technology at their disposal. This increase in technology does not necessarily mean that students are more motivated or in a position to engage in learning. Many students are now entering the classroom with some form of knowledge of how to use a computer and teachers are starting to use multimodal pedagogies.

Current research in the area of students using and operating within virtual environments has produced limited and mixed results in the types of visual rhetoric taught and learned within the composition classroom. Most of this research centers on the use of WebCT, Wiki, MOOS, and Moodle programs within many freshmen level composition classrooms across the nation. While these programs have proven valuable in the field of composition studies to produce an atmosphere where multiple-literacies can thrive, other non-traditional programs such as Myspace and Facebook have yet to be fully examined. With programs such as these, the visual and textual aspects of rhetoric take on a new meaning, which emphasizes how images and texts are interwoven within a virtual environment. This study provides quantitative data that examines how freshmen within a 1301 composition classroom at Texas A&M Christi views and understands these two programs within the context of a social network inside and outside of the academic community, as well as how they view visuals and writing in a virtual environment. Before I begin to discuss the study, I will briefly explain some of the theoretical frameworks that have influenced these types of multimodal classrooms.