SGarza.KrystalsResponseToGeorge History

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Krystal, I love your strategy of using visuals to help students overcome writer's block, but I can see a lot of similarities in the mental processes that go on in composing writing or visuals. The brilliance of your approach is, although both a similar mental activities, the slight shift in focus can help free a student's mind to write. My question to you is do you think your students think of creating visuals as a form of composing, or do they just view it as a tactic to spark their writing?
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Krystal, I love your strategy of using visuals to help students overcome writer's block, but I can see a lot of similarities in the mental processes that go on in composing writing or visuals. The brilliance of your approach is, although both a similar mental activities, the slight shift in focus can help free a student's mind to write. My question to you is do you think your students think of creating visuals as a form of composing, or do they just view it as a tactic to spark their writing?

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'''Response from Chelsea'''

Krystal, I always love reading your responses. You always bring such a fresh and unique perspective that I always feel connected to. I'm sad I won't be in class tonight to chat... but anyways, I really felt you hit the nail on the head when you talked about how students get really excited when they learn new words in school and then hear them in the media. The connection! The light bulb! The Aha! The moment when school and reality collide and maybe for a minute they see we (teachers) get it and that we're contributing something relevant to their lives.

You have such a succinct way of writing out your understanding of how their minds operate. I have many cousins a few years younger than me that fit that description to a T (this one: "''Students have the attention span of a cat stalking a bird in the backyard; if we measure the length of songs on the radio or commercials on TV or scenes in a movie, it is no wonder why''.") I could definitely see you researching something like this with your high school students. If you ever do pursue any research with them, please let me know; I'd love to help!

And-- I love the drawing strategy :)

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We are in an absolutely visual culture. As George writes, is crucial to understand how very complicated and sophisticated visual communication is to students who have grown up in what by all accounts is an aggressively visual (1432). Students have the attention span of a cat stalking a bird in the backyard; if we measure the length of songs on the radio or commercials on TV or scenes in a movie, it is no wonder why. This generation needs to the instruction, and they need to move around. I agree that seeing comes before words. With some of my lower level writers, I ask them to draw pictures of their concepts/ideas like they did when they were young. Then, I ask them to tell me the story of the picture like they did when they were young. This activity makes it easier for them to and legitimize their thoughts. It is an excellent way to begin the writing process for students who have as well.
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We are in an absolutely visual culture. As George writes, is crucial to understand how very complicated and sophisticated visual communication is to students who have grown up in what by all accounts is an aggressively visual (1432). Students have the attention span of a cat stalking a bird in the backyard; if we measure the length of songs on the radio or commercials on TV or scenes in a movie, it is no wonder why. This generation needs to the instruction, and they need to move around. I agree that seeing comes before words. With some of my lower level writers, I ask them to draw pictures of their concepts/ideas like they did when they were young. Then, I ask them to tell me the story of the picture like they did when they were young. This activity makes it easier for them to and legitimize their thoughts. It is an excellent way to begin the writing process for students who have as well.

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Response from Matt

Krystal, I love your strategy of using visuals to help students overcome writer's block, but I can see a lot of similarities in the mental processes that go on in composing writing or visuals. The brilliance of your approach is, although both a similar mental activities, the slight shift in focus can help free a student's mind to write. My question to you is do you think your students think of creating visuals as a form of composing, or do they just view it as a tactic to spark their writing?
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When I read as literary text, (1434) many instances of my students reporting to me days, sometimes weeks later, after learning a new word or concept in class and hearing it on TV came to mind: euphemisms on ,000 Ways to Die, the word juggernaut on a vehicle commercial, pathos on and Order, etc. It is a wonderful thing when they are excited about recognizing what they learn in school out in the world. It is extremely interesting that a student has never reported, with the same excitement, experiencing this when reading a book or the newspaper.

We are in an absolutely visual culture. As George writes, is crucial to understand how very complicated and sophisticated visual communication is to students who have grown up in what by all accounts is an aggressively visual (1432). Students have the attention span of a cat stalking a bird in the backyard; if we measure the length of songs on the radio or commercials on TV or scenes in a movie, it is no wonder why. This generation needs to the instruction, and they need to move around. I agree that seeing comes before words. With some of my lower level writers, I ask them to draw pictures of their concepts/ideas like they did when they were young. Then, I ask them to tell me the story of the picture like they did when they were young. This activity makes it easier for them to and legitimize their thoughts. It is an excellent way to begin the writing process for students who have as well.