SGarza.LAmpLEmail History

Hide minor edits - Show changes to output - Cancel

Changed lines 62-63 from:
-<-Bueno, Manuela. "The Effects of Electronic Mail on Spanish L2 Discourse." Language Learning & Technology 1.2 (1998) 55-70.
to:
-<-Bueno, Manuela. "The Effects of Electronic Mail on Spanish L2 Discourse." ''Language Learning & Technology'' 1.2 (1998) 55-70.
Changed lines 62-64 from:
-<-Bueno, Manuela. "The Effects of Electronic Mail on Spanish L2 Discourse." Language Learning & Technology
1.2 (1998) 55-70.
to:
-<-Bueno, Manuela. "The Effects of Electronic Mail on Spanish L2 Discourse." Language Learning & Technology 1.2 (1998) 55-70.
Added lines 62-64:
-<-Bueno, Manuela. "The Effects of Electronic Mail on Spanish L2 Discourse." Language Learning & Technology
1.2 (1998) 55-70.
Changed lines 47-53 from:
%color=#990000%'''IV. What pedagogical theory or theories does this technology work best with?'''

*Critical Pedagogy
**An emphasis on critical literacy in a technological/digital environment provides a space to explore power structures, socioeconomic differences, and the hierarchies that exist in society (both generally and in terms of literacy) (Jenkins & Boyd).

----
to:
May 03, 2009, at 07:54 PM CST by 24.175.187.89 -
Changed line 10 from:
**In one study, scholars Graduate-level ESL class used email to interact with their instructor. This study showed a vast increase of communication between instructors and students using email over the previously primarily verbal communications. This believed to be because email (Bloch 117)
to:
**In one study, scholars Graduate-level ESL class used email to interact with their instructor. This study showed a vast increase of communication between instructors and students using email over the previously primarily verbal communications. This is believed to be because email allowed for an informality that reduced the level of formality in the teacher/student relationship (Bloch 117).
Changed lines 49-51 from:
to:
*Critical Pedagogy
**An emphasis on critical literacy in a technological/digital environment provides a space to explore power structures, socioeconomic differences, and the hierarchies that exist in society (both generally and in terms of literacy) (Jenkins & Boyd).
Changed lines 56-82 from:
-<boyd
to:
-<Allen, Michael, et al. "Portfolios, WAC, Email, and Assessment: An Inquiry on Portnet." ''Situating Portfolios: Four Perspectives''. Ed. Kathleen Blake Yancey and Irwin Weiser. Logan: Utah State UP, 1997. 370-84.

-<Bloch, Joel. /Teacher Interaction Via Email: the Social Context of Internet Discourse. ''Journal of Second Language Writing'' 11.2 (2002): 117-134.

-<Bush, Laura L. "Class Peer Review in a Computer-Mediated Classroom: Using Classroom Projection Capabilities and E-mail Messages." ''Strategies for Teaching First-Year Composition''. Eds. Duane Roen, Veronica Pantoja, Lauren Yena, Susan K. Miller, and Eric Waggoner. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 2002. 453-457.

-<CCCC. Position Statement on Teaching, Learning, and Assessing Writing in Digital Environments. 25 Feb. 2004. 28 Mar. 2009. <http://www.ncte.org/about/over/positions/category/comp/115775.htm >.

-<Daniell, Beth. "Envisioning Literacy: Establishing E-Mail in a First-Year Program." ''Kitchen Cooks, Plate Twirlers and Troubadours: Writing Program Administrators Tell Their Stories''. Ed. Diana George. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1999. 150-161.

-<Dillon, Sam. "What Corporate America Can't Build: A Sentence." ''New York Times'' 7 Dec. 2004.

-<Huett, Jason. "Email as an Educational Feedback Tool: Relative Advantages and Implementation Guidelines." ''International Jorunal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning'' 1.6 (2004). <http://www.itdl.org/Journal/Jun_04/article06.htm >.

-<Krause, Steven D. "When Blogging Goes Bad: A Cautionary Tale about Blogs, Email Lists, Discussion, and Interaction." ''Kairos'' 9.1 (Fall 2004).

-<Maynor, Natalie. "The Language of Electronic Mail: Written Speech?" ''Publication of the American Dialect Society'' 78.1 (1994): 48-54.

-<Rose, Jeanne Marie. "'B Seeing U' in Unfamiliar Places: ESL Writers, Email Epistolaries, and Critical Computer Literacy." ''Computers and Composition'' 21.1 (2004):

-<Shamoon, Linda K. "International E-mail Debate." ''Electronic Communication Across the Curriculum''. Ed. Donna Reiss, Dickie Selfe, and Art Young. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1998. 151-161.

-<Strenski, Ellen, Caley O'Dwyer Feagin, and Jonathan A. Singer. "Email Small Group Peer Review Revisited." ''Computers and Composition'' 22.2 (2005): 191-208.

-<Vie, Stephanie. Divide 2.0: and Online Social Networking Sites in the Composition Classroom. ''Computers & Composition'' 25.1 (2008): 9-23.

-<Warshauer, Mark. -Mail for English Teaching: Bringing the Internet and Computer-Learning Networks into the Language Classroom. TESOL, 1995.
May 03, 2009, at 06:46 PM CST by 24.175.187.89 -
Added lines 1-54:
This section was prepared by John Lamerson for Dr. Susan Garza's Spring 2009 Composition Theory and Pedagogy course at Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi.

----

%color=#990000%'''I. How is email being used in the composition classroom?'''

*'''A. Peer-response:'''
**Email has been used in the classroom for peer response within small groups is different from larger-scale, one-to-many computer-based communication tools (CBCT) on class mailing lists, bulletin boards, blogs, and wikis on the one hand and smaller-scale, one-to-one email exchange between an individual student and a peer tutor on the other hand. The benefits of assignments that require small groups to respond electronically and asynchronously to each other's drafts are analyzed and illustrated: rhetorical/thematic, discursive/environmental, technological, logistical/time management. The practicalities of exchange of drafts, deadlines, and other guidelines are explained and illustrated in typical student email responses and model instructor handouts (Strenski 195).
*'''B. Interaction with Instructor:'''
**In one study, scholars Graduate-level ESL class used email to interact with their instructor. This study showed a vast increase of communication between instructors and students using email over the previously primarily verbal communications. This believed to be because email (Bloch 117)
*'''C. International debate:'''
**For the past four years at the University of Rhode Island, small groups of American students used e-mail to formally debate a variety of topics with peer groups in universities in England, Ireland, Korea, Finland, the Netherlands, India, and other countries (Shamoon 151). This project, called International Email Debate, began with efforts of the University of Rhode Island's College of Business to "globalize" their curriculum, but it quickly evolved into a writing-intensive, small-group project that could be part of any class (Shamoon 152). Scholars concluded from the University of Rhode Island's three-year test with International E-mail Debate that international e-mail communication creates highly focused, formal, topical writing (Shamoon 161).

----
%color=#990000%'''II. What are the benefits of using email in the composition classroom?'''

There are several reasons e-mail is useful in the English composition classroom:
*It provides students an excellent opportunity for real and natural communication (Warshauer);
*It empowers students for independent learning (Warshauer);
*It enriches the experiences of teachers (Warshauer); and
*It provides regular student feedback (Huett).

Email promotes foreign language learning in and out of the classroom.

Studies have identified the following benefits of email on foreign language learning (-Bueno 69):
*(1) Greater amount of language;
*(2) More variety of topics and language functions;
*(3) Higher level of language accuracy;
*(4) More similarity with oral language;
*(5) More student-initiated interactions; and
*(6) More personal and expressive language use.

Other studies have concluded that technological literacies assist students in assimilating into American undergraduate communities. These studies concluded that technological literacy assists dialogue with other literacy practices (Rose 239).

----
%color=#990000%'''III. What are some potential problems with using email in the composition classroom?'''

*A. Students may be more technologically literate than their instructors (Vie 9).

*B. Some students of lower socioeconomic backgrounds may be underprepared for using email than their other classmates (Vie 11).

*C. Students may not learn to write properly for post-graduate business and professional settings (Dillon 1).

A study by the National Commission on Writing, a panel established by the College Board, concluded that a third of employees in the nation's blue-chip companies wrote poorly and that businesses were spending as much as $3.1 billion annually on remedial training. An entire educational industry has developed to offer remedial writing instruction to adults, with hundreds of public and private universities, for-profit schools and freelance teachers offering evening classes as well as workshops, video and online courses in business and technical writing (Dillon 2).

----
%color=#990000%'''IV. What pedagogical theory or theories does this technology work best with?'''


----

%color=#990000%'+'''Bibliography of sources:'''+'

-<boyd