SGarza.MichellesWhitePaperSourceAndBook History

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Changed lines 5-6 from:
As I did more research into choosing a book for the book review, my interests shifted into a more feminist approach. I came across the book Rhetorica in Motion: Feminist Rhetorical Methods and Methodologies, which focuses on feminist rhetoric of various studies like disability, aging, Latina, queer, transgender, and transnational. The Canagarajah is still applicable to the book I chose, so I will use it as one source.
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As I did more research into choosing a book for the book review, my interests shifted into a more feminist approach. I came across the book Rhetorica in Motion: Feminist Rhetorical Methods and Methodologies, which focuses on feminist rhetoric of various studies like disability, aging, Latina, queer, transgender, and transnational. The Canagarajah article is still applicable to the book I chose because it focuses specifically with multilingual women, so I will use it as one source.
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I know this post is a bit all over the place, but it's because as I find things I keep adding to it. I discovered another source that I'm thinking will work pretty well for the book I chose. It focuses on women's contribution to rhetoric throughout western history and how they use language to reflect themselves and their age.

-<Lunsford, Andrea A. Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the Rhetorical Tradition. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh, 1995. Print.
Changed lines 9-13 from:
-<Schell, Eileen E., and K. J. Rawson. Rhetorica in Motion: Feminist Rhetorical Methods & Methodologies. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh, 2010. Print.
to:
-<Schell, Eileen E., and K. J. Rawson. Rhetorica in Motion: Feminist Rhetorical Methods & Methodologies. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh, 2010. Print.

I know this post is a bit all over the place, but it's because as I find things I keep adding to it. I discovered another source that I'm thinking will work pretty well for the book I chose. It focuses on women's contribution to rhetoric throughout western history and how they use language to reflect themselves and their age.

-<Lunsford, Andrea A. Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the Rhetorical Tradition. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh, 1995
. Print.
Added lines 1-9:
I originally wanted to focus on multilingual writers and their struggles with the writing experience, specifically whether or not to write in their first language or how much of their first language to include in their writings. I came across an article by Canagarajah, which I thought would be useful.

-<Canagarajah, Suresh. "Multilingual Writers and the Academic Community: towards a Critical Relationship." Journal of English for Academic Purposes 1 (2002): 29-44. Print.

As I did more research into choosing a book for the book review, my interests shifted into a more feminist approach. I came across the book Rhetorica in Motion: Feminist Rhetorical Methods and Methodologies, which focuses on feminist rhetoric of various studies like disability, aging, Latina, queer, transgender, and transnational. The Canagarajah is still applicable to the book I chose, so I will use it as one source.

Book for review:

-<Schell, Eileen E., and K. J. Rawson. Rhetorica in Motion: Feminist Rhetorical Methods & Methodologies. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh, 2010. Print.