SGarza.PedagogyLiteracyAndVisualRhetoric History

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This harkens back to description of legions of literacies. An important aspect to consider in a world where virtual environments are now taking up time and space within the composition classroom is how teachers, as well as students, view, use, and understand this medium within the context of reader, writer, and audience. The idea of the world looking in on us and we looking back out onto it is becoming a reality in multimodal classrooms. In her essay in this journal, Textbook Images, by Laura Salinas, she questions the meaning of the word " and questions if there is such a thing as a (Salinas, 2007, p. 4). With the increase of technology in the compostion classroom, Internet interaction is becoming more important. Websites such as Myspace and Facebook are now a common visitor in the composition classroom. Many teachers interpret this as an intrusion into the personalized space where learning is supposed to occur. However, these programs do represent a social network where students write and communicate with one another. Like Wiki, Moodle, and WebCT, Myspace and Facebook is an alternative medium in which students can write and make meaning within a larger social network.
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This harkens back to description of legions of literacies. An important aspect to consider in a world where virtual environments are now taking up time and space within the composition classroom is how teachers, as well as students, view, use, and understand this medium within the context of reader, writer, and audience. The idea of the world looking in on us and we looking back out onto it is becoming a reality in multimodal classrooms. In her essay in this journal, Textbook Images, by Laura Salinas, she questions the meaning of the word " and questions if there is such a thing as a (Salinas, 2007, p. 4). With the increase of technology in the composition classroom, Internet interaction is becoming more important. Websites such as Myspace and Facebook are now a common visitor in the composition classroom. Many teachers interpret this as an intrusion into the personalized space where learning is supposed to occur. However, these programs do represent a social network where students write and communicate with one another. Like Wiki, Moodle, and WebCT, Myspace and Facebook is an alternative medium in which students can write and make meaning within a larger social network.
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This harkens back to description of legions of literacies. An important aspect to consider in a world where virtual environments are now taking up time and space within the composition classroom is how teachers, as well as students, view, use, and understand this medium within the context of reader, writer, and audience. The idea of the world looking in on us and we looking back out onto it is becoming a reality in multimodal classrooms. In her essay, Textbook Images, by Laura Salinas, she questions the meaning of the word "text" and questions if there is such a thing as a "pure text" (Salinas, 2007, p. 4). Websites such as Myspace and Facebook are now a common visitor in the composition classroom. Many teachers interpret this as an intrusion into the personalized space where learning is supposed to occur. However, these programs do represent a social network where students write and communicate with one another. Like Wiki, Moodle, and WebCT, Myspace and Facebook is an alternative medium in which students can write and make meaning within a larger social network.
to:
This harkens back to description of legions of literacies. An important aspect to consider in a world where virtual environments are now taking up time and space within the composition classroom is how teachers, as well as students, view, use, and understand this medium within the context of reader, writer, and audience. The idea of the world looking in on us and we looking back out onto it is becoming a reality in multimodal classrooms. In her essay in this journal, Textbook Images, by Laura Salinas, she questions the meaning of the word " and questions if there is such a thing as a (Salinas, 2007, p. 4). With the increase of technology in the compostion classroom, Internet interaction is becoming more important. Websites such as Myspace and Facebook are now a common visitor in the composition classroom. Many teachers interpret this as an intrusion into the personalized space where learning is supposed to occur. However, these programs do represent a social network where students write and communicate with one another. Like Wiki, Moodle, and WebCT, Myspace and Facebook is an alternative medium in which students can write and make meaning within a larger social network.
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This harkens back to description of legions of literacies. An important aspect to consider in a world where virtual environments are now taking up time and space within the composition classroom is how teachers, as well as students, view, use, and understand this medium within the context of reader, writer, and audience. The idea of the world looking in on us and we looking back out onto it is becoming a reality in multimodal classrooms. In her essay, " ," by Laura Salinas, she questions the meaning of the word "text" and questions if there is such a thing as a "pure text" (Salinas, 2007, p. 4). Websites such as Myspace and Facebook are now a common visitor in the composition classroom. Many teachers interpret this as an intrusion into the personalized space where learning is supposed to occur. However, these programs do represent a social network where students write and communicate with one another. Like Wiki, Moodle, and WebCT, Myspace and Facebook is an alternative medium in which students can write and make meaning within a larger social network.
to:
This harkens back to description of legions of literacies. An important aspect to consider in a world where virtual environments are now taking up time and space within the composition classroom is how teachers, as well as students, view, use, and understand this medium within the context of reader, writer, and audience. The idea of the world looking in on us and we looking back out onto it is becoming a reality in multimodal classrooms. In her essay, Textbook Images, by Laura Salinas, she questions the meaning of the word "text" and questions if there is such a thing as a "pure text" (Salinas, 2007, p. 4). Websites such as Myspace and Facebook are now a common visitor in the composition classroom. Many teachers interpret this as an intrusion into the personalized space where learning is supposed to occur. However, these programs do represent a social network where students write and communicate with one another. Like Wiki, Moodle, and WebCT, Myspace and Facebook is an alternative medium in which students can write and make meaning within a larger social network.
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This harkens back to description of legions of literacies. An important aspect to consider in a world where virtual environments are now taking up time and space within the composition classroom is how teachers, as well as students, view, use, and understand this medium within the context of reader, writer, and audience. The idea of the world looking in on us and we looking back out onto it is becoming a reality in multimodal classrooms. Websites such as Myspace and Facebook are now a common visitor in the composition classroom. Many teachers interpret this as an intrusion into the personalized space where learning is supposed to occur. However, these programs do represent a social network where students write and communicate with one another. Like Wiki, Moodle, and WebCT, Myspace and Facebook is an alternative medium in which students can write and make meaning within a larger social network.
to:
This harkens back to description of legions of literacies. An important aspect to consider in a world where virtual environments are now taking up time and space within the composition classroom is how teachers, as well as students, view, use, and understand this medium within the context of reader, writer, and audience. The idea of the world looking in on us and we looking back out onto it is becoming a reality in multimodal classrooms. In her essay, " ," by Laura Salinas, she questions the meaning of the word "text" and questions if there is such a thing as a "pure text" (Salinas, 2007, p. 4). Websites such as Myspace and Facebook are now a common visitor in the composition classroom. Many teachers interpret this as an intrusion into the personalized space where learning is supposed to occur. However, these programs do represent a social network where students write and communicate with one another. Like Wiki, Moodle, and WebCT, Myspace and Facebook is an alternative medium in which students can write and make meaning within a larger social network.
June 27, 2007, at 01:53 AM CST by 152.163.100.16 -
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Social constructivism has become the dominant theory within composition studies. The redefining of literacy within many North American learning institutions has helped to bring about this shift. John Trimbur (2004) says, [I] ndividuals do not simply acquire literacy but actually build for themselves the tools to produce (p. 262). These tools (i.e. drawings, writing, etc.) determine how an individual makes meaning within a larger social context. James E. Porter and Patricia A. Sullivan (2004) state:
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Social constructivism has become the dominant theory within composition studies. The redefining of literacy within many North American learning institutions has helped to bring about this shift. John Trimbur (2004) says, [I] ndividuals do not simply ''acquire'' literacy but actually ''build'' for themselves the tools to produce (p. 262). These tools (i.e. drawings, writing, etc.) determine how an individual makes meaning within a larger social context. James E. Porter and Patricia A. Sullivan (2004) state:
June 27, 2007, at 01:38 AM CST by 152.163.100.16 -
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Social constructivism has become the dominant theory within composition studies. The redefining of literacy within many North American learning institutions has helped to bring about this shift. John Trimbur (2004) says, [I] ndividuals do not simply acquire literacy but actually build for themselves the tools to produce (p. 262). These tools (i.e. drawings, writing, etc.) determine how an individual makes meaning within a larger social context. James E. Porter and Patricia A. Sullivan (2004) state:

The object of analysis for those in rhetoric and composition is
not only the written text, but the writer-in-the-act-of-writing,
and also the audience. We examine the text, not as an autonomous
structure, so much as a stage in an overall process of action
involving the writer and the audience, as well as numerous other
discourses. Rhetoric complicates discourse study by involving
matters related to situation and process-the setting for
discourse as well means by which it is produced and received
(Porter & Sullivan, 2004, p. 292).

Gunther Kress (2003) interprets writing similarly by dealing with various forms of texts within a genre (Kress, 2003, p. 53). However, this description of writing still views writing within the prescribed academic world where there is little room for multiple-literacies to flourish. J. L. (2004) are description offers a perspective of what types of literacies do students bring with them to the classroom (Lemke, 2004, p. 71). The literacies that freshmen students encounter when they enter a discourse community do not replace, and should not replace, the literacies that they bring with them. Because many composition classrooms are becoming digital and employing the use of programs such as WebCT, Wiki, and Moodle into the pedagogy, the traditional definition of rhetoric is also changing. However, with the Internet in the classroom, this is starting to change the way teachers and students view research, communication, writing, and the use, and purpose, of rhetoric in a digital world.

For the purposes of this study, I will define visual rhetoric as involving the cognitive and social processes of using, understanding, and analyzing an optically perceived image (i.e. writing, drawing etc.) within a certain contextualized framework. I think that the main concern should not fall on visual rhetoric in the composition classroom. Understanding the pedagogical models should be the main concern for any teacher to begin with but not end there. Using visuals within the classroom should be part of the teaching arsenal but not simply as an activity or assignment. Charles A. Hill (2003) asserts most basic, and perhaps the most misguided, of these assumptions is that we could ever draw a distinct line between the visual and the verbal, or the concentrating on one can or should require the (Hill, 2003, p. 109). point is valid in the field of composition, and Trimbur echoes this as well:

The complicated relationship between reading and seeing text and
image raises interesting questions for writing studies about how
we might think about the page as a unit of discourse-about how,
say, the juxtaposition of articles, photographs, and
advertisements on a newspaper or magazine page creates larger
messages than any single item can convey (Trimbur, 2004, p.
268).

This harkens back to description of legions of literacies. An important aspect to consider in a world where virtual environments are now taking up time and space within the composition classroom is how teachers, as well as students, view, use, and understand this medium within the context of reader, writer, and audience. The idea of the world looking in on us and we looking back out onto it is becoming a reality in multimodal classrooms. Websites such as Myspace and Facebook are now a common visitor in the composition classroom. Many teachers interpret this as an intrusion into the personalized space where learning is supposed to occur. However, these programs do represent a social network where students write and communicate with one another. Like Wiki, Moodle, and WebCT, Myspace and Facebook is an alternative medium in which students can write and make meaning within a larger social network.