SGarza.PeterElbowAmpTheExpressivistTheoryOfVoice History

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May 11, 2009, at 10:51 AM CST by 70.120.211.101 -
Changed lines 15-18 from:
''But there is something I call the freewriting muscle that I often do talk about although not usually by that name. It's a crucial cognitive and linguistic ability that everyone has an ability that most people demonstrate every day in speaking.

It
's the ability to utter words and thoughts about the topic at hand entirely without mentally rehearsing them beforehand. Few people do that when they write. "Unplanned language" sounds like what our teachers all warned us against, but it's very precious when we are trying to write.'' (Elbow and Sorcinelli).
to:
''But there is something I call the freewriting muscle that I often do talk about although not usually by that name. It's a crucial cognitive and linguistic ability that everyone has an ability that most people demonstrate every day in speaking.''

''It'
s the ability to utter words and thoughts about the topic at hand entirely without mentally rehearsing them beforehand. Few people do that when they write. 'Unplanned language' sounds like what our teachers all warned us against, but it's very precious when we are trying to write.'' (Elbow and Sorcinelli).
May 11, 2009, at 10:41 AM CST by 70.120.211.101 -
Changed lines 15-18 from:
'' But there is something I call the freewriting muscle that I often do talk about although not usually by that name. It's a crucial cognitive and linguistic ability that everyone has an ability that most people demonstrate every day in speaking.

It's the ability to utter words and thoughts about the topic at hand entirely without mentally rehearsing them beforehand. Few people do that when they write. "Unplanned language" sounds like what our teachers all warned us against, but it's very precious when we are trying to write. '' (Elbow and Sorcinelli).
to:
''But there is something I call the freewriting muscle that I often do talk about although not usually by that name. It's a crucial cognitive and linguistic ability that everyone has an ability that most people demonstrate every day in speaking.

It's the ability to utter words and thoughts about the topic at hand entirely without mentally rehearsing them beforehand. Few people do that when they write. "Unplanned language" sounds like what our teachers all warned us against, but it's very precious when we are trying to write.'' (Elbow and Sorcinelli).
May 11, 2009, at 10:40 AM CST by 70.120.211.101 -
Changed lines 15-18 from:
''But there is something I call the freewriting muscle that I often do talk about although not usually by that name. It's a crucial cognitive and linguistic ability that everyone has an ability that most people demonstrate every day in speaking.

It's the ability to utter words and thoughts about the topic at hand entirely without mentally rehearsing them beforehand. Few people do that when they write. "Unplanned language" sounds like what our teachers all warned us against, but it's very precious when we are trying to write.'' (Elbow and Sorcinelli).
to:
'' But there is something I call the freewriting muscle that I often do talk about although not usually by that name. It's a crucial cognitive and linguistic ability that everyone has an ability that most people demonstrate every day in speaking.

It's the ability to utter words and thoughts about the topic at hand entirely without mentally rehearsing them beforehand. Few people do that when they write. "Unplanned language" sounds like what our teachers all warned us against, but it's very precious when we are trying to write. '' (Elbow and Sorcinelli).
May 11, 2009, at 10:39 AM CST by 70.120.211.101 -
Changed lines 7-8 from:
Most students have been taught by writing teachers to draft, get feedback, and revise (even if many of them skip this sequence when they can). Most students can see how writing is a process of slowly constructed meaning, often socially negotiated through feedback. They have learned that clarity is not what we start with but what we work toward. Fewer students are prey to the once-common myth that good writers sit down and immediately produce excellent writing out of some magical genius place in their heads. (Elbow, Writing First)
to:
''Most students have been taught by writing teachers to draft, get feedback, and revise (even if many of them skip this sequence when they can). Most students can see how writing is a process of slowly constructed meaning, often socially negotiated through feedback. They have learned that clarity is not what we start with but what we work toward. Fewer students are prey to the once-common myth that good writers sit down and immediately produce excellent writing out of some magical genius place in their heads.'' (Elbow, Writing First)
Changed lines 15-18 from:
But there is something I call the freewriting muscle that I often do talk about although not usually by that name. It's a crucial cognitive and linguistic ability that everyone has an ability that most people demonstrate every day in speaking.

It's the ability to utter words and thoughts about the topic at hand entirely without mentally rehearsing them beforehand. Few people do that when they write. "Unplanned language" sounds like what our teachers all warned us against, but it's very precious when we are trying to write. (Elbow and Sorcinelli).
to:
''But there is something I call the freewriting muscle that I often do talk about although not usually by that name. It's a crucial cognitive and linguistic ability that everyone has an ability that most people demonstrate every day in speaking.

It's the ability to utter words and thoughts about the topic at hand entirely without mentally rehearsing them beforehand. Few people do that when they write. "Unplanned language" sounds like what our teachers all warned us against, but it's very precious when we are trying to write.'' (Elbow and Sorcinelli).
May 11, 2009, at 10:30 AM CST by 70.120.211.101 -
Changed lines 11-12 from:
To an expressivist, the act of writing embodies the continuum between the creative and the critical. Elbow initially discourages the idea of as writing in the creative process. He recommends a method where the writer finds voice through the act of writing, ignoring the concerns of quality or craft until the revision phase. In Writing With Power, Elbow claims that the writer does not to give in to this dilemma of creative versus critical thinking and submit to the domination of one muscle and lose the benefits of the these two skills used alternately undermine each other at all, they enhance each (9). Rather than viewing these elements as pure opposites, Elbow advocates a symbiosis where unrestrained writing is revised and pared down until the final product reaches a heightened state of resonance.
to:
To an expressivist, the act of writing embodies the continuum between the creative and the critical. Elbow initially discourages the idea of as writing in the creative process. He recommends a method where the writer finds voice through the act of writing, ignoring the concerns of quality or craft until the revision phase. In ''Writing With Power'', Elbow claims that the writer does not to give in to this dilemma of creative versus critical thinking and submit to the domination of one muscle and lose the benefits of the these two skills used alternately undermine each other at all, they enhance each (9). Rather than viewing these elements as pure opposites, Elbow advocates a symbiosis where unrestrained writing is revised and pared down until the final product reaches a heightened state of resonance.
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While critics such as David Bartholomae and James Berlin have challenged theories, several of techniques still remain in active use in college classrooms. Freewriting and journaling methods represent legacy within the academic environment, especially in the creative writing classroom. While ideas continue to spark debate between expressivists and social-constructivists, his influence continues to be felt decades after the publication of Writing Without Teachers.
to:
While critics such as David Bartholomae and James Berlin have challenged theories, several of techniques still remain in active use in college classrooms. Freewriting and journaling methods represent legacy within the academic environment, especially in the creative writing classroom. While ideas continue to spark debate between expressivists and social-constructivists, his influence continues to be felt decades after the publication of ''Writing Without Teachers''.
May 10, 2009, at 08:50 PM CST by 24.167.86.156 -
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As a general rule, expressivist theorists approach creative writing as a series of bipolar forces acting upon each other. Voice embodies an important element of these bipolar forces within the craft. Consequently, voice is a critical foundation of the expressivist theory of writing.

One of the major tenets of expressivist theory is the idea that there are two processes within creative writing: the creative method and the critical method. In practice, these two elements contrast each other and create a pendulum of opposites that strengthen and define each other.

Peter Elbow was one of the leading pioneers of voice theory in the late and early . Elbow played a major role in the development of techniques used within composition for decades, including freewriting and journaling. However, his ultimate goal behind the use of these techniques is the development of what Elbow refers to as (Elbow 189). For Elbow, attaining is an ongoing process towards a destination, and not an immediate breakthrough:

Most students have been taught by writing teachers to draft, get feedback, and revise (even if many of them skip this sequence when they can). Most students can see how writing is a process of slowly constructed meaning, often socially negotiated through feedback. They have learned that clarity is not what we start with but what we work toward. Fewer students are prey to the once-common myth that good writers sit down and immediately produce excellent writing out of some magical genius place in their heads. (Elbow, Writing First)

Consequently, in the expressivist view, the student must accept a realistic mindset towards writing in order to find voice. Once this mindset is accepted, the student must devote consistent effort towards developing that voice through practice, which will often consist of journaling exercises. This sense of dedication to the act of writing itself, regardless of quality, is a cornerstone of Elbowian theory.

To an expressivist, the act of writing embodies the continuum between the creative and the critical. Elbow initially discourages the idea of as writing in the creative process. He recommends a method where the writer finds voice through the act of writing, ignoring the concerns of quality or craft until the revision phase. In Writing With Power, Elbow claims that the writer does not to give in to this dilemma of creative versus critical thinking and submit to the domination of one muscle and lose the benefits of the these two skills used alternately undermine each other at all, they enhance each (9). Rather than viewing these elements as pure opposites, Elbow advocates a symbiosis where unrestrained writing is revised and pared down until the final product reaches a heightened state of resonance.

For Elbow, freewriting is an essential element of this process of bridging the continuum:

But there is something I call the freewriting muscle that I often do talk about although not usually by that name. It's a crucial cognitive and linguistic ability that everyone has an ability that most people demonstrate every day in speaking.

It's the ability to utter words and thoughts about the topic at hand entirely without mentally rehearsing them beforehand. Few people do that when they write. "Unplanned language" sounds like what our teachers all warned us against, but it's very precious when we are trying to write. (Elbow and Sorcinelli).

In theory, freewriting embodies the unrestrained thoughts of the writer, perhaps the way the writer might speak in casual conversation. The pure flow of creativity would, according to Elbow, remove any barriers to the creative process by simply writing through the barrier. It is this creative flow that embodies voice, because the conscious mind has no chance to impose limits that silence that flow. freewriting techniques offer the writer a pure voice that can be focused later during the process of revision.

For expressivists like Elbow, the goal of writing is to capture lively sound of (Elbow 292). By tapping in to the fundamental persona of the writer, the writing finds resonance and real voice, thus leading to the development of effective writing.

methods gave significant advancements to the creative writing instructor. The creative writing instructor will approach the creative/critical pendulum on a deeper level than the composition instructor will. In the creative writing class, the goal is to remove all barriers to the creative end of the spectrum to foster real voice, while using the critical process to refine the creativity into a workable product. However, the emphasis will focus upon the creative process, while keeping a lower priority upon the critical process. In the creative writing classroom, the creative process generates voice, while the critical process removes all lifeless and voiceless passages from the creative work.

While critics such as David Bartholomae and James Berlin have challenged theories, several of techniques still remain in active use in college classrooms. Freewriting and journaling methods represent legacy within the academic environment, especially in the creative writing classroom. While ideas continue to spark debate between expressivists and social-constructivists, his influence continues to be felt decades after the publication of Writing Without Teachers.