SGarza.PracticalApplications History

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In this article, Groban attempts to reveal the disconnections in wrting and academics that students face; she offers guidance in order to better understand why there is such a disinterest in that much of college is simply viewed as a means to gain employment. This, then, creates a lack of understanding of the function of education on the students' part. She suggests a means of understanding students in a way that helps to create a curriculum with the students', what can be called, "disadvantage" in mind.
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In this article, Groban attempts to reveal the disconnections in wrting and academics that students face; she offers guidance in order to better understand why there is such a disinterest in that much of college is simply viewed as a means to gain employment. This, then, creates a lack of understanding of the function of education on the students' part. She suggests a means of understanding students in a way that helps to create a curriculum with the students', what can be called, "disadvantage" in mind.
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In this article, Forell suggests a way to teach Basic Writing that incorporates rap and hip-hop music--emphasizing the idea that students will be more engaged in the act of writing, if they write on and from what they already know.
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In this article, Forell suggests a way to teach Basic Writing that incorporates rap and hip-hop music--emphasizing the idea that students will be more engaged in the act of writing, if they write on and from what they already know.
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Fitts discusses the "art" of giving students authority in the writing classroom; she offers an answer to the question of "how to?" in the way in which we should incorporate pop-culture in the writing classroom.
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Fitts discusses the "art" of giving students authority in the writing classroom; she offers an answer to the question of "how to?" in the way in which we should incorporate pop-culture in the writing classroom.
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Giroux emphasizes the issue of the students' loss of voice, self-worth and a kind of academic conciousness. He argues that this loss is due to the adults of our society--thier "neglect and mistreatment" (as cited in Groban 5).
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Giroux emphasizes the issue of the students' loss of voice, self-worth and a kind of academic conciousness. He argues that this loss is due to the adults of our society--thier "neglect and mistreatment" (as cited in Groban 5).
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In this article, Gitlin argues that students enter into college with a deeper understanding of technologies than literature and histories. This is something that needs to be understood if students are to remain the most important aspect of the Basic Writing classroom--if teachers are to remain concious of the idea that they are teaching ''writers'' a ''process'' in which to write, they are not teaching ''writing''.
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In this article, Gitlin argues that students enter into college with a deeper understanding of technologies than literature and histories. This is something that needs to be understood if students are to remain the most important aspect of the Basic Writing classroom--if teachers are to remain concious of the idea that they are teaching ''writers'' a ''process'' in which to write, they are not teaching ''writing''.
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Gilyard argues for process practices in the writing classroom, stating that the process method of instruction "is indeed fitting...for [African American] students and than teachers can more fruitfully challenge the abuse of process methods than the process paradigm itself" (8). In this particular chapter, entitled "African American in Process," Gilyard makes clear the need to understand the purpose of process in the writing classroom.
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Gilyard argues for process practices in the writing classroom, stating that the process method of instruction "is indeed fitting...for [African American] students and than teachers can more fruitfully challenge the abuse of process methods than the process paradigm itself" (8). In this particular chapter, entitled "African American in Process," Gilyard makes clear the need to understand the purpose of process in the writing classroom.
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Elbow offers practical applications in understanding writing as a ''process''
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Elbow offers practical applications in understanding writing as a ''process''
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*Laurie Grobman, (Re)writing Youth: Basic Writing, Youth Culture and Social (Shows the disconnections students face, attempts to understand why there is such a disinterest in that much of college is simply viewed as a means to gain employment.)
*Leigh Hamm Forell, in Practice: Hip-Hop to the
*Karen Fitts, , Life Practices, and Pop Culture: So Why is This Called Writing Class? (Discusses giving students authority, answers
the "how to?" question.)
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*Laurie Grobman, (Re)writing Youth: Basic Writing, Youth Culture and Social
In this article, Groban attempts to reveal the disconnections in wrting and academics that students face; she offers guidance in order to better understand why there is such a disinterest in that much of college is simply viewed as a means to gain employment. This, then, creates a lack of understanding of the function of education on the students' part. She suggests a means of understanding students in a way that helps to create a curriculum with the students', what can be called, "disadvantage" in mind.
*Leigh Hamm Forell, in Practice: Hip-Hop to the
In this article, Forell suggests a way to teach Basic Writing that incorporates rap and hip-hop music--emphasizing the idea that students will be more engaged in the act of writing, if they write on and from what they already know.
*Karen Fitts, , Life Practices, and Pop Culture: So Why is This Called Writing Class?
Fitts discusses the "art" of giving students authority in the writing classroom; she offers an answer to the question of "how to?" in the way in which we should incorporate pop-culture in the writing classroom.
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Giroux emphasizes the issue of the students' loss of voice, self-worth and a kind of academic conciousness. He argues that this loss is due to the adults of our society--thier "neglect and mistreatment" (as cited in Groban 5).
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*Keith Gilyard, '' Flip the Script: An African American Discourse on Language, Literature and Learning''
*Peter Elbow, ''Writing With Power: Techniques for Mastering the Writing Process'' (Practical applications in understanding writing as a ''process'')
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In this article, Gitlin argues that students enter into college with a deeper understanding of technologies than literature and histories. This is something that needs to be understood if students are to remain the most important aspect of the Basic Writing classroom--if teachers are to remain concious of the idea that they are teaching ''writers'' a ''process'' in which to write, they are not teaching ''writing''.
*Keith Gilyard, from '' Flip the Script: An African American Discourse on Language, Literature and Learning''
Gilyard argues for process practices in the writing classroom, stating that the process method of instruction "is indeed fitting...for [African American] students and than teachers can more fruitfully challenge the abuse of process methods than the process paradigm itself" (8). In this particular chapter, entitled "African American in Process," Gilyard makes clear the need to understand the purpose of process in the writing classroom.
*Peter Elbow, ''Writing With Power: Techniques for Mastering the Writing Process''
Elbow offers practical applications in understanding writing as a ''process''
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Many expressive practices stress the use of creative thinking/writing as a means to move toward critical thinking. If the objective is for studetns to begin establishing an academic conciousness, then the means in which students move from their world (which Stephen Johnson argues in ''Everything Bad is Good For You'' enforces creative and analytical thinking) to the academic world must be one that validates what students already know and, in turn, will help them establish themselves as individuals--they must believe that it is ok for them to "think outside the box," something that requires creativity, a kind of critical creativity. Here, I'm offering a list of resources that help to understand the uses of pop-culture in the Basic Writing classroom, that offer tips, advice and practices, and that may also help in creating practices that would ultimately help shift students toward an academic conciousness:
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Many expressive practices stress the use of creative thinking/writing as a means to move toward critical thinking. If the objective is for studetns to begin establishing an academic conciousness, then the means in which students move from their world (which Stephen Johnson argues, in ''Everything Bad is Good For You'', enforces creative and analytical thinking) to the academic world must be one that validates what students already know and, in turn, will help them establish themselves as individuals--they must believe that it is ok for them to "think outside the box," something that requires creativity, a kind of critical creativity. Here, I'm offering a list of resources that help to understand the uses of pop-culture in the Basic Writing classroom, that offer tips, advice and practices, and that may also help in creating practices that would ultimately help shift students toward an academic conciousness:
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Many expressive practices stress the use of creative thinking/writing as a means to move toward critical thinking. If the objective is for studetns to begin establishing an academic conciousness, then a common practice of expressive pedagogues is have students create what they know in order to show that they understand the rhetoric involved and the uses of voice that necessary in writing.
to:
Many expressive practices stress the use of creative thinking/writing as a means to move toward critical thinking. If the objective is for studetns to begin establishing an academic conciousness, then the means in which students move from their world (which Stephen Johnson argues in ''Everything Bad is Good For You'' enforces creative and analytical thinking) to the academic world must be one that validates what students already know and, in turn, will help them establish themselves as individuals--they must believe that it is ok for them to "think outside the box," something that requires creativity, a kind of critical creativity. Here, I'm offering a list of resources that help to understand the uses of pop-culture in the Basic Writing classroom, that offer tips, advice and practices, and that may also help in creating practices that would ultimately help shift students toward an academic conciousness:

*Laurie Grobman, (Re)writing Youth: Basic Writing, Youth Culture and Social (Shows the disconnections students face, attempts to understand why there is such a disinterest in that much of college is simply viewed as a means to gain employment.)
*Leigh Hamm Forell, in Practice: Hip-Hop to the
*Karen Fitts, , Life Practices, and Pop Culture: So Why is This Called Writing Class? (Discusses giving students authority, answers the "how to?" question.)
*Henry Giroux, Pedagogy and the Responsibility of Intellectuals; Youth, Littleton, and the Loss of
*Todd Gitlin, Arts Versus Information
*Keith Gilyard, '' Flip the Script: An African American Discourse on Language, Literature and Learning''
*Peter Elbow, ''Writing With Power: Techniques for Mastering the Writing Process'' (Practical applications in understanding writing as a ''process'')
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Many expressive practices stress the use of creative thinking/writing as a means to move toward critical thinking. If the objective is for studetns to begin establishing an academic conciousness, then a common practice of expressive pedagogues is have students create what they know in order to show that they understand the rhetoric involved and the uses of voice that necessary in writing.