SGarza.QuestionFromWillma History

Hide minor edits - Show changes to output - Cancel

Changed lines 3-4 from:
In our large group session last week, Crystal said building her students confidence is a part of her pedagogical strategies for teaching. She does this by giving her students the opportunity to write whatever they want for the first couple of months of the school year. After that time period, she teaches the grammar and sentence construction. Her strategy is a good example of pedagogical diversity.
to:
In our large group session last week, Crystal said building the students' confidence is a part of her pedagogical strategies for teaching. She does this by giving them the opportunity to write whatever they want for the first couple of months of the school year. After that time period, she teaches grammar and sentence structure. This is a good example of pedagogical diversity.
Changed lines 1-5 from:
Coming from the era of phonics, spelling tests, traditional grammar, and the teacher in total control of every aspect of the classroom, it took me a while to grasp process pedagogy. While reading viewpoints, my initial thoughts were way, especially when there was reference made to the stepping outside the institutions and discourses of (Atkinson 1573) for whatever reason in my opinion. However, after reading experience with process pedagogy, it seem so peculiar, but I can understand the concern for phonics, spelling tests and grammar lessons in first grade (11). In addition, I can also understand why some critics felt that a would fail to provide enough structure, guidance, and direct instruction about particular conventions and (11). Gradually becoming a bit more liberated while reading views, I too, recognized the positive attributes of Process Pedagogy, but I was anticipating getting to a section in the article where its popularity would diminish. When postprocess was introduced, I was relieved and also impressed with application of pedagogical diversity. Does anybody remember the educational animated educational series Rock? If so, would it be a good fit for pedagogical diversity? If some of you young people are not familiar with Schoolhouse Rock, take a look at Conjunction Junction http://j.mp/hM7q3K and Grammar Rock http://j.mp/i0VwxE.

Last week during our WHEWT Mapping The Field discussion, our topic was Product vs. Process in Pedagogical studies. As part of
our conversation, Traci briefly talked about her experiences with the product and process aspects of teaching writing. Hopefully, we will discuss both further at our next class meeting.

P.S.-If
you like the Blues, check out Schoolhouse Rock's Old School Hit, Naughty Number Nine http://j.mp/fgQh3T.
to:
Coming from the era of phonics, spelling tests, traditional grammar, and the teacher in total control of every aspect of the classroom, it took me a while to grasp process pedagogy. While reading viewpoints, my initial thoughts were way, especially when there was reference made to the stepping outside the institutions and discourses of (Atkinson 1573) for whatever reason in my opinion. However, after reading experience with process pedagogy, it seem so peculiar, but I can understand the concern for phonics, spelling tests and grammar lessons in first grade (11). In addition, I can also understand why some critics felt that a would fail to provide enough structure, guidance, and direct instruction about particular conventions and (11). Gradually becoming a bit more liberated while reading views, I too, recognized the positive attributes of Process Pedagogy, but I was anticipating getting to a section in the article where its popularity would diminish. When postprocess was introduced, I was relieved and also impressed with application of pedagogical diversity.

In our large group session last week, Crystal said building her students confidence is
a part of her pedagogical strategies for teaching. She does this by giving her students the opportunity to write whatever they want for the first couple of months of the school year. After that time period, she teaches the grammar and sentence construction. Her strategy is a good example of pedagogical diversity.

During
our WHEWT Mapping The Field discussion, our topic was Product vs. Process in Pedagogical studies. As part of our conversation, Traci briefly talked about her experiences with the product and process aspects of teaching writing. Hopefully, we will discuss both further at our next class meeting.

Does anybody remember the educational animated educational series Rock? If so, would it be a good fit for pedagogical diversity or is it too obsolete? If some of you young people are not familiar with Schoolhouse Rock, take a look at Conjunction Junction http://j.mp/hM7q3K and Grammar Rock http://j.mp/i0VwxE.
If you like the Blues, check out Schoolhouse Rock's Old School Hit, Naughty Number Nine http://j.mp/fgQh3T.
Changed line 5 from:
P.S.-If you like the Blues, check out Schoolhouse Rock's Naughty Number Nine http://j.mp/fgQh3T.
to:
P.S.-If you like the Blues, check out Schoolhouse Rock's Old School Hit, Naughty Number Nine http://j.mp/fgQh3T.
Changed lines 1-5 from:
Coming from the era of phonics, spelling tests, traditional grammar, and the teacher in total control of every aspect of the classroom, it took me a while to grasp process pedagogy. While reading viewpoints, my initial thoughts were way, especially when there was reference made to the stepping outside the institutions and discourses of (Atkinson 1573) for whatever reason in my opinion. However, after reading experience with process pedagogy, it seem so peculiar, but I can understand the concern for phonics, spelling tests and grammar lessons in first grade (11). In addition, I can also understand why some critics felt that a would fail to provide enough structure, guidance, and direct instruction about particular conventions and (11). Gradually becoming a bit more liberated while reading views, I too, recognized the positive attributes of Process Pedagogy, but I was anticipating getting to a section in the article where its popularity would diminish. When postprocess was introduced, I was relieved and also impressed with application of pedagogical diversity. Does anybody remember the educational animated educational series Rock? If so, would it be a good fit for pedagogical diversity? If some of you young people are not familiar with Schoolhouse Rock, take a look at Conjunction Junction http://j.mp/hM7q3K and Grammar Rock http://j.mp/i0VwxE. Last week during our WHEWT Mapping The Field discussion, our topic was Product vs. Process in Pedagogical studies. As part of our conversation, Traci briefly talked about her experiences with the product and process aspects of teaching writing. Hopefully, we will discuss both further at our next class meeting.
to:
Coming from the era of phonics, spelling tests, traditional grammar, and the teacher in total control of every aspect of the classroom, it took me a while to grasp process pedagogy. While reading viewpoints, my initial thoughts were way, especially when there was reference made to the stepping outside the institutions and discourses of (Atkinson 1573) for whatever reason in my opinion. However, after reading experience with process pedagogy, it seem so peculiar, but I can understand the concern for phonics, spelling tests and grammar lessons in first grade (11). In addition, I can also understand why some critics felt that a would fail to provide enough structure, guidance, and direct instruction about particular conventions and (11). Gradually becoming a bit more liberated while reading views, I too, recognized the positive attributes of Process Pedagogy, but I was anticipating getting to a section in the article where its popularity would diminish. When postprocess was introduced, I was relieved and also impressed with application of pedagogical diversity. Does anybody remember the educational animated educational series Rock? If so, would it be a good fit for pedagogical diversity? If some of you young people are not familiar with Schoolhouse Rock, take a look at Conjunction Junction http://j.mp/hM7q3K and Grammar Rock http://j.mp/i0VwxE.

Last
week during our WHEWT Mapping The Field discussion, our topic was Product vs. Process in Pedagogical studies. As part of our conversation, Traci briefly talked about her experiences with the product and process aspects of teaching writing. Hopefully, we will discuss both further at our next class meeting.

P.S.-If you like the Blues, check out Schoolhouse Rock's Naughty Number Nine http://j.mp/fgQh3T.
Changed lines 1-2 from:
Coming from the era of phonics, spelling tests, traditional grammar, and the teacher in total control of every aspect of the classroom, it took me a while to grasp process pedagogy. While reading viewpoints, my initial thoughts were way, especially when there was reference made to the stepping outside the institutions and discourses of (Atkinson 1573) for whatever reason in my opinion. However, after reading experience with process pedagogy, it seem so peculiar, but I can understand the concern for phonics, spelling tests and grammar lessons in first grade (11). In addition, I can also understand why some critics felt that a would fail to provide enough structure, guidance, and direct instruction about particular conventions and (11). Gradually becoming a bit more liberated while reading views, I too, recognized the positive attributes of Process Pedagogy, but I was anticipating getting to a section in the article where its popularity would diminish. When postprocess was introduced, I was relieved and also impressed with application of pedagogical diversity. Does anybody remember the educational animated educational series Rock? If so, would it be a good fit for pedagogical diversity? If some of you young people are not familiar with Schoolhouse Rock, take a look at Conjunction Junction http://j.mp/hM7q3K and Grammar Rock Verb http://j.mp/hKFUZc. Last week during our WHEWT Mapping The Field discussion, our topic was Product vs. Process in Pedagogical studies. As part of our conversation, Traci briefly talked about her experiences with the product and process aspects of teaching writing.
Hopefully, we will discuss both further at our next class meeting.
to:
Coming from the era of phonics, spelling tests, traditional grammar, and the teacher in total control of every aspect of the classroom, it took me a while to grasp process pedagogy. While reading viewpoints, my initial thoughts were way, especially when there was reference made to the stepping outside the institutions and discourses of (Atkinson 1573) for whatever reason in my opinion. However, after reading experience with process pedagogy, it seem so peculiar, but I can understand the concern for phonics, spelling tests and grammar lessons in first grade (11). In addition, I can also understand why some critics felt that a would fail to provide enough structure, guidance, and direct instruction about particular conventions and (11). Gradually becoming a bit more liberated while reading views, I too, recognized the positive attributes of Process Pedagogy, but I was anticipating getting to a section in the article where its popularity would diminish. When postprocess was introduced, I was relieved and also impressed with application of pedagogical diversity. Does anybody remember the educational animated educational series Rock? If so, would it be a good fit for pedagogical diversity? If some of you young people are not familiar with Schoolhouse Rock, take a look at Conjunction Junction http://j.mp/hM7q3K and Grammar Rock http://j.mp/i0VwxE. Last week during our WHEWT Mapping The Field discussion, our topic was Product vs. Process in Pedagogical studies. As part of our conversation, Traci briefly talked about her experiences with the product and process aspects of teaching writing. Hopefully, we will discuss both further at our next class meeting.
Changed lines 1-2 from:
Coming from the era of phonics, spelling tests, traditional grammar, and the teacher in total control of every aspect of the classroom, it took me a while to understand how process pedagogy worked. While reading viewpoints, my initial thoughts were way, especially when there was reference made to the stepping outside the institutions and discourses of (Atkinson 1573) for whatever reason in my opinion. However, after reading experience with process pedagogy, it seem so peculiar, but I can understand the concern for phonics, spelling tests and grammar lessons in first grade (11). In addition, I can also understand why some critics felt that a would fail to provide enough structure, guidance, and direct instruction about particular conventions and (11). Gradually becoming a bit more liberated while reading views, I too, recognized the positive attributes of Process Pedagogy, but I was anticipating getting to a section in the article where its popularity would diminish. When postprocess was introduced, I was relieved and also impressed with application of pedagogical diversity. Does anybody remember the educational animated educational series Rock? If so, should it be included in pedagogical diversity? If some of you young people are not familiar with Schoolhouse Rock, take a look at Conjunction Junction at
http://j.mp/hM7q3K. Last week during our WHEWT Mapping The Field discussion, our topic was Product vs. Process in Pedagogical studies. As part of our conversation, Traci briefly talked about her experiences with the product and process aspects of teaching writing.
to:
Coming from the era of phonics, spelling tests, traditional grammar, and the teacher in total control of every aspect of the classroom, it took me a while to grasp process pedagogy. While reading viewpoints, my initial thoughts were way, especially when there was reference made to the stepping outside the institutions and discourses of (Atkinson 1573) for whatever reason in my opinion. However, after reading experience with process pedagogy, it seem so peculiar, but I can understand the concern for phonics, spelling tests and grammar lessons in first grade (11). In addition, I can also understand why some critics felt that a would fail to provide enough structure, guidance, and direct instruction about particular conventions and (11). Gradually becoming a bit more liberated while reading views, I too, recognized the positive attributes of Process Pedagogy, but I was anticipating getting to a section in the article where its popularity would diminish. When postprocess was introduced, I was relieved and also impressed with application of pedagogical diversity. Does anybody remember the educational animated educational series Rock? If so, would it be a good fit for pedagogical diversity? If some of you young people are not familiar with Schoolhouse Rock, take a look at Conjunction Junction http://j.mp/hM7q3K and Grammar Rock Verb http://j.mp/hKFUZc. Last week during our WHEWT Mapping The Field discussion, our topic was Product vs. Process in Pedagogical studies. As part of our conversation, Traci briefly talked about her experiences with the product and process aspects of teaching writing.
Added lines 1-3:
Coming from the era of phonics, spelling tests, traditional grammar, and the teacher in total control of every aspect of the classroom, it took me a while to understand how process pedagogy worked. While reading viewpoints, my initial thoughts were way, especially when there was reference made to the stepping outside the institutions and discourses of (Atkinson 1573) for whatever reason in my opinion. However, after reading experience with process pedagogy, it seem so peculiar, but I can understand the concern for phonics, spelling tests and grammar lessons in first grade (11). In addition, I can also understand why some critics felt that a would fail to provide enough structure, guidance, and direct instruction about particular conventions and (11). Gradually becoming a bit more liberated while reading views, I too, recognized the positive attributes of Process Pedagogy, but I was anticipating getting to a section in the article where its popularity would diminish. When postprocess was introduced, I was relieved and also impressed with application of pedagogical diversity. Does anybody remember the educational animated educational series Rock? If so, should it be included in pedagogical diversity? If some of you young people are not familiar with Schoolhouse Rock, take a look at Conjunction Junction at
http://j.mp/hM7q3K. Last week during our WHEWT Mapping The Field discussion, our topic was Product vs. Process in Pedagogical studies. As part of our conversation, Traci briefly talked about her experiences with the product and process aspects of teaching writing.
Hopefully, we will discuss both further at our next class meeting.