Now that you have analyzed a website, or in some cases created a website, using the guidelines and principles from course readings, you are ready to go to the next step, which is to write a recommendation report that will present what you have learned. I cannot give you an "exact" template of what the report should include since you will all need to shape your documents based on what you have found and how best to present it.

Review the instructions for the Web Analysis Project.

Go over what you have written about the website already. Then make a list of desired changes (or the choices you made for sites that were built from scratch) and categorize them (by the topics covered in the course readings) and use those as headings for the main parts of the paper. Explain the recommendation and then explain the reason for the changes using info from the course readings to explain the reason for the recommendation. Those who created a website will do more of an Informational Report explaining how the site was developed using info from the course texts to explain the reason for the design choices.

Of course you will need intro material to let the reader know what the project was all about and what you are reporting on.

Many of you have made note in the weekly postings of things that are working well on the sites you are analyzing. If you have a good amount of that info, you could have a section on that. It's always good to point out the positives, especially when recommending ways to change things that are not so good.

The audience for your report will be the contact person responsible for the website. (For those creating websites, the audience will still be the contact person for the group you created the website for, but your purpose will be to explain the site and why you created the site the way you did and how it will meet the needs of the organization.) One key thing about audience is determining their understanding of the technologies. Do they know how to spell HTML or know what JavaScript? is? The style of language you use in the report needs to be at a level the audience can understand. In addition to creating content for the websites, that's your main job. It's also good to make comparisons between the current site and the changes you'll be making (use links to the current site to point the reader to exactly what you are referring to). Exemplify the benefits of the changes and if possible term it in cost savings. Maybe the new new site will lower bandwidth usage, which saves money. Think about what your audience will want to hear and what will be meaningful to them.

Remember, the people you are writing to did not take the class. Nor did they read the course materials. So you will have to write for an audience that is unfamiliar with what we've been doing and unfamiliar with what you have hopefully learned from the course readings. You may also find it useful to include screen shots. That can make it much easier to explain some things. Here are a couple of links with info on how to do screen shots: http://www.take-a-screenshot.org/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=muG_ZvAE2jM These are just suggestions. You may have to Google to find info related to your specific computer setup.

Always wrap up your report even if you just have a couple of sentences inviting the reader to contact you for more info. It's good customer service to connect with your readers beyond just plopping down the info. If the reader came into your store you wouldn't just hand them the things they ask for and then say nothing. You would invite them to contact you with questions and to feel free to come back to you for additional help, right? I would recommend the Purdue OWL (Online Writing Lab) as a great resource for all things related to writing. If you've never used it, it's a good thing to know about. Here is a link to where they talk about this kind of report https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/726/06/.

And of course there's the obviously infamous question, seemingly the only question most students know how to ask when it comes to writing: "How many pages does it have to be?" Here's the answer: "Enough pages to do all that needs to be done." Think of the person who is your audience standing in front of you and asking you: "What exactly do I need to do?" You have to write a report that will explain everything, exactly, in full detail of what they need to do to make the website better. (For those of you creating websites, you have to explain everything you did and why what you did is of value to the group you created it for.)

SINGLE SPACE!!!!!! Reports are written in single-space.

Once your report is written, save it as a pdf file and post in the BB discussion space.

Attach:RubricRecReport3379.pdf