SGarza.WhatAreSomeIssuesSpecificallyToTeachersUtilzingToolsSuchAsE-mailAndWebCTInTeaching History

Hide minor edits - Show changes to output - Cancel

Added lines 59-60:
e. As far as the online discussion, I have been in a course where the online discussion were bad fast. There were arguments between students online, since the course's content was controversial people seemed to have trouble explaining and expressing their opinions via internet. I think this is due to written language having the restriction of no feelings, or people getting overly brave sitting behind a computer screen.
Changed lines 23-73 from:
As far as webct and online essay submissions go, I think the main issue is communication as well, but it can often be that the instructor will offer too much advice, or that he/she will 'over-correct' an essay or response in order to ensure that the student is getting all of the help he/she needs. This is based on experiences I've had in the writing center where particular students felt bogged down by all the information. On the other hand, when an instructor says too little, students tend to be confused. So, how can we determine the kind of effective communication that both a teacher and a student would need in an online class? How can we ensure that the same teaching methods that are used in the classroom can be applied in an online setting (if that is at all possible)?
to:
As far as webct and online essay submissions go, I think the main issue is communication as well, but it can often be that the instructor will offer too much advice, or that he/she will 'over-correct' an essay or response in order to ensure that the student is getting all of the help he/she needs. This is based on experiences I've had in the writing center where particular students felt bogged down by all the information. On the other hand, when an instructor says too little, students tend to be confused. So, how can we determine the kind of effective communication that both a teacher and a student would need in an online class? How can we ensure that the same teaching methods that are used in the classroom can be applied in an online setting (if that is at all possible)?

------

'''Yvette'''

Technology and Teaching of Writing
Charles Moran

What Are Some Issues Specifically To Teachers Utilzing Tools Such As E-mail And Web CT In Teaching?

'''''Pre-Reading Notes:'''''

''1. Pros''

a. Teacher availability

b. Accountability of the students

c. Parents have access in lower levels

d. Work can be done quicker as students learn how to write/revise and publish quicker as well

e. Emailing assignments, as a student, I loved it when a professor was computer savvy and able to proof reading, and give feed back to student via email

''2. Cons''

a. On-line assignments: limit where homework can be done (if you have no internet at home) What about students of under privileged homes, who do not have access to the internet or even a computer at home?
i. How do the parents of these homes interact with computers? Does this affect the child as well? For instance, I had a parent conference last week, where the mother said I could email her, but then turned to the student to ask him her email with his progress, and then told me he is the one that helps her check her email.

b. Less one-on-one experience with teacher or professor

c. Giving less significance to textbooks if the assignments can be read on-line

d. How do students know what is appropriate to email a teacher/professor? Does it sometimes blend the line of authority?

''3. Questions:''

a. In the Corpus Christi School District, they encourage the use of multi-media activities, assignments and presentations. We have school websites, where the parents and students can log on, see their grades (like Web CT), look at their syllabus, check the schedule, and etc. Our supervisors state that with the appropriate use of these technologies it will enhance the learning experience. I understand and agree with this to a point, but as a teacher, are we just pacifying their short attention spans, by adding flashy colors and catchy sounds to our presentations? Should the students learn to expect this in the classroom? And with the continuation of this, shall we expect to see a even stronger degrading of the traditional classroom setting? I believe that traditional is not always the way to go, but should we begin to just throw that pedagogy completely out of the spectrum? I guess this is my guilty/nervous conscious writing, but I feel almost guilty sometimes, when I make the presentations sooo interesting, I mean the student learn how to extend their attention spans? But this tangent is on the topic of all new technology, and not particularly e-mail and WebCT.

b. What about the Webspiration website we use in class? How does that affect the students? I began using it in one of my writing labs and the students really enjoyed the computerized interaction of brainstorming, outlining and etc.

'''''After Reading Notes:'''''

1. It though it was interesting how Moran states that is pressure on colleges and universities, too, to keep up with technology. If one does not, as the saying goes, one is road kill on the information . I suppose I have to agree with this. This does seem to be an issue in education with technology. Just last week, we have to completed a star chart, which evaluated our use of technology in the classroom, and how well we felt our technology was up to date.

2. However, is no proof yet that technology improves , I think some of the older fashioned/traditional teachers have an issue with the technology usage in the classroom because they feel that the students are simply being given what they want, as opposed to what they need. I personally, as a brand new teacher, am on the fence about the issue, but have seen it come to fruition.

3. Since this article has been published? How do you think these issues and ideas have changed? For instance, the interaction of students from different races, sexes, ethnicities and cultures? He states that in a student conducted in 1991, and Computers in Composition that women interacted differently with computers than males did, it was seen as the . Is that still true today? Then in a more recent study by Gail Hawisher, women were still seen as the .

4. I agree with statement that: As Americans, we are reluctant to admit that we are a nation divided by wealth and social class. But we are, as this wealth gap produces a technology gap, just as it produces a health care gap, or an access-to-legal-serives gap, . I feel this is entirely true. However, if there are imperative advantages to using technology in the classroom, how do we in the education realm bypass the issues and complication of social class and the variance access each class holds? Should the school districts make sure each school has equal access to technology and computers? How do we make up for the gap at the homes
?
Added line 22:
Changed lines 17-22 from:
A big thing to remember, I think, is that the instructor is still in charge of classroom management, even when class communications are online instead of in person. Another is for students to remember to be respectful - really, just observe many of the same guidelines you would follow in the actual classroom, and the WebCT/email stuff should flow rather smoothly.
to:
A big thing to remember, I think, is that the instructor is still in charge of classroom management, even when class communications are online instead of in person. Another is for students to remember to be respectful - really, just observe many of the same guidelines you would follow in the actual classroom, and the WebCT/email stuff should flow rather smoothly.
----
!!!!Michelle G.

This is one of the questions that I had while reading the article. Moran seems to be concerned with the sense of intimacy (whether the conversations are appropriate or not) between the teacher/student that e-mailing can evoke which can lead to a loss of teacher authority. Moran asks the question: "How do we maintain appropriate authority online?" (210) I didn't come up with an answer...ha Moran goes one to quote Gail Hawisher who says of the teacher/student web interaction, "In the new medium, the teacher and student together will have to establish what is, and what is not, appropriate behavior" (210). I don't really have an answer as far as how those boundaries should be established either...haha I think the availability aspect certainly allows for comfort in that there is a sense of anonymity and yet there is the problem of dictating too much through e-mail. There is no real privacy, as Moran points out, and because 'private' conversations can easily be spread, how you communicate online will be different than how you would in an office or classroom, and more often than not (in my opinion) it is ineffective (or maybe just not as effective as oral communication).
As far as webct and online essay submissions go, I think the main issue is communication as well, but it can often be that the instructor will offer too much advice, or that he/she will 'over-correct' an essay or response in order to ensure that the student is getting all of the help he/she needs. This is based on experiences I've had in the writing center where particular students felt bogged down by all the information. On the other hand, when an instructor says too little, students tend to be confused. So, how can we determine the kind of effective communication that both a teacher and a student would need in an online class? How can we ensure that the same teaching methods that are used in the classroom can be applied in an online setting (if that is at all possible)?
Added lines 6-17:

-----

'''James'''

It seems like one of the major issues with email in the Moran article was the idea of 24-hour accountability for both students and teachers. I don't know if that is really a valid problem since most of us realize that not everyone checks their e-mail every hour of the day, but I guess for those lacking in some aspect of common sense, it might be a problem. In that case, you could just set the rules from the outset of class. You could just say, "I check my email in the morning at such and such time and at night at such and such time. I expect you to do the same so that we can all stay up to date about what is happening in class."

I think WebCT could be prone to students getting really personal in their online arguing from what I've heard. I've never actually experienced this, so I don't know. That sounds like poor online classroom management to me, but I don't know enough about the situation to really criticize the person who was in charge of the class. Were the rules not set down well enough in the beginning? Why did they think that was acceptable? Those are some questions I would need answered before being able to evaluate the situation. At any rate, that is something that could be a problem.

The other thing was the issue of formality. If a "balance of power" between instructors and students is what is desired, then it could be a good thing for the tone to be more informal. Still, it could result in abuse and disrespect, so that might need to be monitored carefully.

A big thing to remember, I think, is that the instructor is still in charge of classroom management, even when class communications are online instead of in person. Another is for students to remember to be respectful - really, just observe many of the same guidelines you would follow in the actual classroom, and the WebCT/email stuff should flow rather smoothly.
Added line 4:
Added lines 1-4:
'''Holly C.'''

The first issue I see from reading article is that the use of e-mail as a means of communication between teacher and student can create a blurring of the boundaries that traditionally exist between students and teachers. Because the students are communicating with their teachers through a medium that they also use to communicate with friends and close acquaintances, the student may not be as likely to be as formal or as professional as they would be f they were meeting the professor face to face. The other issue Moran brings up is that the easy accessibility of e-mail can create a situation where the professor is now accessible 24/7, whereas, normally, a student and professor would normally meet during normal business hours. I go back and forth with this. Being a harried, exhausted teacher myself, I know how important my weekends and other down time is to me. I do not like sharing that time, and am very selfish with it. Even though I check e-mail, I like to have to answer a work related message over break. Having this desire or lack thereof for myself, I can understand why Moran would bring this up as an issue. However, I can also look at this from the perspective of the student. I can remember many occasions during my undergrad and even a few now when I have e-mailed a teacher at say 9:00 PM on a Friday night, expecting and, really, needing a response. It was always nice when the professor got back to me. Dr. J. Haswell was particularly good at this. I can remember one evening when I e-mailed her at ten and got a reply from her by ten thirty.
The WebCT issue is an issue due to the problem of boundaries. Moran says that being in online discussions reduces the group dynamic and creates a place where students may be more likely to cross boundaries that were set in the classroom. It is difficult to flame somebody in person. It is not nearly as difficult to flame that same person online, because you do not have to see the reaction when it occurs. It is the job to create a safe, secure learning environment, where all feel comfortable enough to express their opinions. By placing a discussion online, the teacher somewhat limits his or herself. Yes, the teacher can moderate, but, unless the teacher is just on the computer all of the time, there is a delay during which a hostile post does have the potential to hurt others. I am reminded of another class I took during undergrad. The teacher had simply asked the students to post about what they thought of the class so far. Out of consideration, she allowed for people to be anonymous. What resulted as a situation where people began insulting each other. The issue bled over into class and made discussion impossible. feelings were so hurt that the remainder of the semester was very tense.