In the article, "Keeping Kids Engaged Fights Plagiarism, Too," Doug Johnson argues that in the time that educators spend trying to catch students who plagiarize, they should really be spending more time creating assignments that "require original, thoughful research and, therefore, minimize plagiarism" (16). Johnson recommends the following:

  • Clarity of Purpose and Expectations
  • Giving the students choices-If the core concept of the reseach assignment is clearly identified, then the students will be able to pick the specific topic that they want to focus on.
  • Make the Assignment Relevant to the Students' Lives-Students are more apt to do research that they are truly invested in.
  • Ask student to write in a narrative style
  • Stress Higher Level thinking skills and creativity-Look to get students higher in Bloom's Taxonomy of learning
  • Ask them to answer real questions-Ask students questions they can answer.
  • Involve Varied Information Gathering Activities
  • Make the project hands on-Let the students experiment with writing, interviewing, photography, layout, design, speaking
  • Use technology-Many student find technology motivating
  • Use formats the engage multiple senses-"Our ability to digitize and present information can now include drawings, photos, sounds, music, animation, even movies-all formats allowing students to include important, often unique information in their projects" (19).
  • Complex but manageable steps-Large projects can be overwhelming to students,which could tempt them to cheat. However, "planning smaller steps, building timelines, incorporating frequent deadlines, and scheduling multiple conferences can make the complex manageable" (19).
  • Collaboration can produce great work-Johnson believes that collaborative assignments help to develop interpersonal skills and can help to reduce the liklihood of plagiarism occuring (20).
  • They are authentically assessed-students should be expected to take part in creating the assessment
  • Allow learners to "reflect, revisit, revise, and improve their final projects" (20).
    • Johnson, Doug. "Keeping Kids Engaged Fights Plagiarism, Too." Phi Delta Kapan. 85:7 (2004). MLA. 12 March 2007.