Welcome to Composition 1302!

srsly?

Today's Objectives

  • Brief Overview of the Course
  • Get to know each other
  • Practice Rhetorical Analysis

About the Course

  • Syllabus rundown (and corrections!)
  • How to contact me
  • Texts
  • Classroom info (and make note of April 5th!)

About You

Please put the following in an email to me:

  • Your name as it appears on SAIL, and what you'd like to be called if it's something different (if I already know you, just put the name that I know you by).
  • List 3 things you want to learn in this course
  • Tell me (in detail) what you're passionate about!



Meet and Greet

  • Before we do anything else, we should get to know the people we'll be spending this semester with!
  • First, I'd like you to do some reflection:
    • On a scratch piece of paper (you can tear & share if you need to!), write a brief description of how your personal strengths helped you through ENGL 1301 and how they could help you AND your classmates succeed in this class. You can be a little silly if you'd like, but do your best to realistically represent yourself!
    • Next, it's snowball fight time!! Crumple your papers and gently throw them; don't hurt anyone :/
    • When we're done, we should have a better idea of how awesome this class is going to be!

History & Rhetoric

  • We're gonna take it easy for the rest of the class by watching a little video footage.
  • We'll be doing some discussion about it, but you don't need to have all the answers to these questions (yet!):
    • What argument is this commercial making? What is it asking us to do, think, believe, or feel?
    • What is the context of this video? (Who are these people? What's going on here?) Draw on your prior knowledge, then use the internet to find out other perspectives.
    • What sort of appeal does the video make: emotional? logical? Does the image use a spokesperson or a famous figure?
    • Is the rhetoric effective? Why or why not?
    • Perhaps most importantly, for whom was this commercial made? Is it appropriate for it's intended audience?
  • Part of your first homework will be to answer these questions. You won't be graded on the accuracy of your answer, but try to be thorough (perhaps by reviewing some of the footage as you answer them).

What is this all about?

  • You're conducting a rhetorical analysis (what we'll be doing for Writing Project 1)
  • Let's go back to the video and discuss some interpretations of it.

Homework

  • Read the syllabus again.
  • Read Chapter 1 in Everything's an Argument. For the rest of the semester, I'll refer to the text as EAA in the class plans. If you haven't yet purchased the text, it's on reserve in the library for you to borrow long enough to read the assignments or make your own copies (although it's probably cheaper just to go ahead and buy it).
  • Complete a Reading Response in which you respond to the prompts from above:
    • What argument is this commercial making? What is it asking us to do, think, believe, or feel?
    • What is the context of this video? (Who are these people? What's going on here?)
    • What sort of appeal does the video make: emotional? logical? Does the image use a spokesperson or a famous figure?
    • Is the rhetoric effective? Why or why not?
    • For whom was this commercial made? Is it appropriate for it's intended audience?
    • Again, you don't have to worry about being wrong or right, just try your best to be thorough. This part of the homework will be due on Monday.